The Real Threat of Artificial Intelligence - 5* read by Kai-Fu Lee

“One way or another, we are going to have to start thinking about how to minimize the looming A.I.-fueled gap between the haves and the have-nots, both within and between nations. Or to put the matter more optimistically: A.I. is presenting us with an opportunity to rethink economic inequality on a global scale. These challenges are too far-ranging in their effects for any nation to isolate itself from the rest of the world.

Kai-Fu Lee is the chairman and chief executive of Sinovation Ventures, a venture capital firm, and the president of its Artificial Intelligence Institute.”

Opinion | The Real Threat of Artificial Intelligence
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/24/opinion/sunday/artificial-intelligence-economic-inequality.html
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Inequality boosted by AI - must read links via Azeem Azhar

“Economic growth has gone hand in hand with rising inequality for more than 9,000 years. Inequalities have only narrowed through war or plague. History offers very little comfort to those in search of peaceful leveling. Is there one? (See also Piketty's 2014 essay, a global, progressive wealth tax is the best solution to spiraling inequality.)

🗜️ The real threat of AI. Kai-Fu Lee: "most of the money being made from artificial intelligence will go to the United States and China. A.I. is an industry in which strength begets strength … [other nations] will essentially become [those] country’s economic dependent, taking in welfare subsidies in exchange for letting the “parent” nation’s A.I. companies continue to profit. A.I. is presenting us with an opportunity to rethink economic inequality on a global scale.””

🔮 Uber and leadership; emotions at work; Apple's secrecy; quantum computing; McJobs, and electric planes ++ #119
http://mailchi.mp/exponentialview/ev119?e=19e1d53fe6
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Is it unethical to design robots to resemble humans? Great story on anthropomorphization

“And so the more we humanize chatbots, virtual assistants, and machines, the more we in turn display human emotions toward them. This is the process of anthropomorphism, whereby inanimate objects are attributed with human emotions, traits, and intentions. When something appears alive, it is in our nature to view it through a human lens. Now that many AIs and conversational bots have the illusion of being self-aware, they therefore trigger emotional responses in their users as if they were human. If the despised printer in Office Space had resembled a human (or a living animal, for that matter), our feelings toward both the object and the violent perpetrators would be altered. That’s why many people cringe when they see Boston Dynamics’ robotic dog getting kicked.”

Is it unethical to design robots to resemble humans?
https://qz.com/1010828/is-it-unethical-to-design-robots-to-resemble-humans/
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The big lesson from Amazon and Whole Foods: Disruptive competition comes out of nowhere - Vivek Wadhwa

“Note the march of Amazon. First it was bookstores, publishing and distribution; then cleaning supplies, electronics and assorted home goods. Now Amazon is set to dominate all forms of retail as well as cloud services, electronic gadgetry and small-business lending. And its proposed acquisition of Whole Foods sees Amazon literally breaking the barriers between the digital and physical realms.

This is the type of disruption we will see in almost every industry over the next decade, as technologies advance and converge and turn the incumbents into toast. We have experienced the advances in our computing devices, with smartphones having greater computing power than yesterday’s supercomputers. Now, every technology with a computing base is advancing on an exponential curve — including sensors, artificial intelligence, robotics, synthetic biology and 3-D printing. And when technologies converge, they allow industries to encroach on one another.”

The big lesson from Amazon and Whole Foods: Disruptive competition comes out of nowhere - Vivek Wadhwa
http://wadhwa.com/2017/06/21/big-lesson-amazon-whole-foods-disruptive-competition-comes-nowhere/
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Carmageddon is Coming – Future Crunch – Medium

“An overlapping confluence of three different technological waves — the smartphone, the electric battery and artificial intelligence — have created the conditions for a technological disruption so profound it’s going to change almost everything about the way we move in modern society.”

Carmageddon is Coming – Future Crunch – Medium
https://medium.com/future-crunch/carmageddon-is-coming-899c0f05a2a
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Google, not GCHQ, is the truly chilling spy network | John Naughton - food for thought !

“one of the spooks with whom I discussed Snowden’s revelations waxed indignant about our coverage of the story. What bugged him (pardon the pun) was the unfairness of having state agencies pilloried, while firms such as Google and Facebook, which, in his opinion, conducted much more intensive surveillance than the NSA or GCHQ, got off scot free. His argument was that he and his colleagues were at least subject to some degree of democratic oversight, but the companies, whose business model is essentially “surveillance capitalism”, were entirely unregulated.

He was right. “Surveillance”, as the security expert Bruce Schneier has observed, is the business model of the internet and that is true of both the public and private sectors. Given how central the network has become to our lives, that means our societies have embarked on the greatest uncontrolled experiment in history. Without really thinking about it, we have subjected ourselves to relentless, intrusive, comprehensive surveillance of all our activities and much of our most intimate actions and thoughts. And we have no idea what the long-term implications of this will be for our societies – or for us"

Google, not GCHQ, is the truly chilling spy network | John Naughton
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jun/18/google-not-gchq--truly-chilling-spy-network
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The Amazon-Walmart Showdown That Explains the Modern Economy / must read via NYT

“Each one is trying to become more like the other — Walmart by investing heavily in its technology, Amazon by opening physical bookstores and now buying physical supermarkets. But this is more than a battle between two business titans. Their rivalry sheds light on the shifting economics of nearly every major industry, replete with winner-take-all effects and huge advantages that accrue to the biggest and best-run organizations, to the detriment of upstarts and second-fiddle players.

That in turn has been a boon for consumers but also has more worrying implications for jobs, wages and inequality.”

The Amazon-Walmart Showdown That Explains the Modern Economy
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/16/upshot/the-amazon-walmart-showdown-that-explains-the-modern-economy.html
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