Rethinking Friedman: Imagining a More Inclusive Capitalism

“think of d.light, a company started in 2007 to bring off-grid solar electricity to 1.5 billion people who lived in the dark after sunset. That level of energy poverty resulted in leaving a huge swath of people without the fundamental building block to create real change in their lives. Imagine the limitations of your prospects if you lacked the power of electricity.

Two young entrepreneurs — Sam Goldman and Ned Tozun — set out to change that. They understood that making markets work for the poor takes time. More importantly, it would take moral imagination. Only by understanding the poor as customers and building solutions from their perspectives could there be a chance of success. d.light had investors — Acumen was amongst the earliest — but we all understood their priority was serving low-income people in broken markets. Financial returns to shareholders would have to wait — more than a decade, as it turned out. But think of what those returns generated in terms of human energy unleashed: jobs, productivity, human connection, better health and a cleaner, more sustainable environment.”

Rethinking Friedman: Imagining a More Inclusive Capitalism
https://jnovogratz.medium.com/rethinking-friedman-imagining-a-more-inclusive-capitalism-60ab1e43f8d7
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How Germany and Costa Rica are putting nature at the heart of their recoveries: a balanced relationship with nature

“First we need to understand the direct relationship between pandemics and zoonosis (transmission of animal-human diseases),” says Rodriguez. “Only by establishing a balanced relationship with nature can we see key benefits such as improved quality of jobs, food and water security, as well as improved human health.””

How Germany and Costa Rica are putting nature at the heart of their recoveries
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/09/costa-rica-germany-nature-based-policy/
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The year of divergence

“The first is to make big, powerful firms mightier—often because those firms provide products and services on which the self-isolation experiment relied. What used to be a convenience—Amazon’s home delivery, Microsoft’s cloud-based office software, Zoom’s video calls, an evening with Netflix—became a necessity, for remote work during the day and a tolerable life afterwards. Weak companies—or ones that looked strong only thanks to book-cooking—were exposed for what there were, and fell by the wayside.”

The year of divergence
https://www.economist.com/business/2020/12/29/the-year-of-divergence
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The Uncanny Valley Vertigo

“We experience vertigo in the uncanny valley because we’ve spent hundreds of thousands of years fine-tuning our nervous systems to read and respond to the subtlest cues in real faces. We perceive when someone’s eyes squint into a smile, or how their face flushes from the cheeks to the forehead, and we also — at least subconsciously — perceive the absence of these organic barometers. Simulations make us feel like we’re engaged with the nonliving, and that’s creepy.”

Buckminster Fuller | How he anticipated today's challenges 50 years ago

“Talking about the role of humans versus computers:

“Man is going to be displaced altogether as a specialist by the computer. Man himself is being forced to reestablish, employ, and enjoy his innate “comprehensivity.”
– Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth (1963)”

Buckminster Fuller | How he anticipated today's challenges 50 years ago
https://rossdawson.com/futurist/best-futurists-ever/buckminster-fuller/
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Why efficiency is dangerous and slowing down makes life better | Psyche Ideas

“A decade ago, the American psychologist Adam Grant and I argued in a journal paper that this ‘too much of a good thing’ phenomenon might be a general rule. Some motivation produces excellent performance; too much motivation produces choking. Some group collaboration produces cohesion and enhances productivity; too much of it leads to staleness. Some empathy enables you to understand what another person is going through; too much could prevent you from saying and doing hard things. Similarly, in my book The Paradox of Choice (2004), I argued that, whereas a life with no freedom to choose is not worth living, a life with too much choice leads to paralysis, bad decisions and dissatisfaction. Finding the right amount – what Aristotle called the ‘mean’ – of motivation, collaboration, empathy, choice and many other aspects of life, including efficiency, is a key challenge we face, both as individuals and as a society.”

Why efficiency is dangerous and slowing down makes life better | Psyche Ideas
https://psyche.co/ideas/why-efficiency-is-dangerous-and-slowing-down-makes-life-better
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The Other Global Power Shift | by Joseph S. Nye, Jr. - Project Syndicate

“The spread of information means that power is more widely distributed, and informal networks can undercut the monopoly of traditional bureaucracy. And the speed of online transmission of information means that governments have less control over their agendas, and citizens face new vulnerabilities.”

The Other Global Power Shift | by Joseph S. Nye, Jr. - Project Syndicate
https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/new-technology-threats-to-us-national-security-by-joseph-s-nye-2020-08
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If you’re not terrified about Facebook, you haven’t been paying attention

“We have already been through the equivalent of a social media pandemic – an unstoppable contagion that has sickened our information space, infected our public discourse, silently and invisibly subverted our electoral systems. It’s no longer about if this will happen all over again. Of course, it will. It hasn’t stopped. The question is whether our political systems, society, democracy, will survive – can survive – the age of Facebook.

We are already through the looking glass. In 2016, a hostile foreign government used Facebook to systematically undermine and subvert an American election. With no consequences. Nobody, no company, no individual or nation state has ever been held to account.”

If you’re not terrified about Facebook, you haven’t been paying attention
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/jul/26/with-facebook-we-are-already-through-the-looking-glass
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