Gartner picks digital ethics and privacy as a strategic trend for 2019

“Any discussion on privacy must be grounded in the broader topic of digital ethics and the trust of your customers, constituents and employees. While privacy and security are foundational components in building trust, trust is actually about more than just these components. Trust is the acceptance of the truth of a statement without evidence or investigation. Ultimately an organisation’s position on privacy must be driven by its broader position on ethics and trust. Shifting from privacy to ethics moves the conversation beyond ‘are we compliant’ toward ‘are we doing the right thing.””

Gartner picks digital ethics and privacy as a strategic trend for 2019
http://social.techcrunch.com/2018/10/16/gartner-picks-digital-ethics-and-privacy-as-a-strategic-trend-for-2019/
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Alexa’s Most Dangerous Feature Can’t Be Undone

“These and other tech corporations have grand ambitions. They want to colonize space. Not interplanetary space. Everyday space: home, office, car. In the near future, everything from your lighting to your air-conditioning to your refrigerator, your coffee maker, and even your toilet could be wired to a system controlled by voice.”

Alexa’s Most Dangerous Feature Can’t Be Undone
https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/11/alexa-how-will-you-change-us/570844/
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Joseph Stiglitz on artificial intelligence: 'We’re going towards a more divided society'

“Beyond the impact of AI on work, Stiglitz sees more insidious forces at play. Armed with AI, tech firms can extract meaning from the data we hand over when we search, buy and message our friends. It is used ostensibly to deliver a more personalised service. That is one perspective. Another is that our data is used against us.

“These new tech giants are raising very deep issues about privacy and the ability to exploit ordinary people that were never present in earlier eras of monopoly power,” says Stiglitz. “Beforehand, you could raise the price. Now you can target particular individuals by exploiting their information.”

We’ve gone from a 60-hour working week to a 45-hour week and we could go to 30 or 25

Joseph Stiglitz
It is the potential for datasets to be combined that most worries Stiglitz. For example, retailers can now track customers via their smartphones as they move around stores and can gather data on what catches their eye and which displays they walk straight past.

“In your interactions with Google, Facebook, Twitter and others, they gather an awful lot of data about you. If that data is combined with other data, then companies have a great deal of information about you as an individual – more information than you have on yourself,” he says.”

Joseph Stiglitz on artificial intelligence: 'We’re going towards a more divided society'
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/sep/08/joseph-stiglitz-on-artificial-intelligence-were-going-towards-a-more-divided-society
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Gartner picks digital ethics and privacy as a strategic trend for 2019

“But what really stands out in Gartner’s list of developing and/or barely emergent strategic tech trends is digital ethics and privacy — given the concept is not reliant on any particular technology underpinning it; yet is being (essentially) characterized as an emergent property of other already deployed (but unnamed) technologies. So is actually in play — in a way that others on the list aren’t yet (or aren’t at the same mass scale).

The analyst dubs digital ethics and privacy a “growing concern for individuals, organisations and governments”, writing: “People are increasingly concerned about how their personal information is being used by organisations in both the public and private sector, and the backlash will only increase for organisations that are not proactively addressing these concerns.”

Yes, people are increasingly concerned about privacy. Though ethics and privacy are hardly new concepts (or indeed new discussion topics). So the key point is really the strategic obfuscation of issues that people do in fact care an awful lot about, via the selective and non-transparent application of various behind-the-scenes technologies up to now — as engineers have gone about collecting and using people’s data without telling them how, why and what they’re actually doing with it.”

Gartner picks digital ethics and privacy as a strategic trend for 2019
http://social.techcrunch.com/2018/10/16/gartner-picks-digital-ethics-and-privacy-as-a-strategic-trend-for-2019/
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GSMA boss urges strong response to digital pressures - Mobile World Live

“There are fears that digital disruption has the potential for destroying jobs and increasing inequality, and in the process, upending the European social model,” said Granryd.

He continued to state that politicians and regulators alike are “seeking to harness the digital revolution” while ensuring Europe’s citizens are fully benefitting, as democracies become a target of “malign influences misusing the networks that are part of our everyday life.”

“The unrestricted nature of the internet, once seen as its greatest virtue, is now being challenged as its greatest weakness,” the GSMA boss added.”

GSMA boss urges strong response to digital pressures - Mobile World Live
https://www.mobileworldlive.com/featured-content/home-banner/gsma-boss-urges-strong-response-to-digital-pressures/
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Tech Workers Now Want to Know: What Are We Building This For?

“Across the technology industry, rank-and-file employees are demanding greater insight into how their companies are deploying the technology that they built. At Google, Amazon, Microsoft and Salesforce, as well as at tech start-ups, engineers and technologists are increasingly asking whether the products they are working on are being used for surveillance in places like China or for military projects in the United States or elsewhere.”

Tech Workers Now Want to Know: What Are We Building This For?
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/07/technology/tech-workers-ask-censorship-surveillance.html
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Universal Basic Income Is Silicon Valley’s Latest Scam

“Uber’s business plan, like that of so many other digital unicorns, is based on extracting all the value from the markets it enters. This ultimately means squeezing employees, customers, and suppliers alike in the name of continued growth. When people eventually become too poor to continue working as drivers or paying for rides, UBI supplies the required cash infusion for the business to keep operating.”

Universal Basic Income Is Silicon Valley’s Latest Scam
https://medium.com/s/powertrip/universal-basic-income-is-silicon-valleys-latest-scam-fd3e130b69a0
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Why Data Needs Humans as Much as Humans Need Data

“The thing that will separate the great agencies and great work from the merely informed and statistically correct is not the quantity of the data, but the quality of the people sifting through, interpreting and applying it—the people who can turn cold, hard facts into insights, ideas and emotions; the people who know how to truly connect with others.”

Why Data Needs Humans as Much as Humans Need Data
https://www.adweek.com/brand-marketing/why-data-needs-humans-as-much-as-humans-need-data/
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Newco Shift | Technology, Humanity, and the Existential Test

“the technology industry reveled for decades as a kind of benighted warrior for societal good. As one Senator told me during the Facebook hearings this past summer, “we purposefully didn’t regulate technology, and that was the right thing to do.” But now? He shrugged. Now, maybe it’s time.”

Newco Shift | Technology, Humanity, and the Existential Test
https://shift.newco.co/2018/09/24/technology-humanity-and-the-existential-test/
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A Model for the Future of Education

“For me it’s about passion, curiosity, imagination, critical thinking, and grit.

Passion: You’d be amazed at how many people don’t have a mission in life… A calling… something to jolt them out of bed every morning. The most valuable resource for humanity is the persistent and passionate human mind, so creating a future of passionate kids is so very important. For my 7-year-old boys, I want to support them in finding their passion or purpose… something that is uniquely theirs. In the same way that the Apollo program and Star Trek drove my early love for all things space, and that passion drove me to learn and do.
Curiosity: Curiosity is something innate in kids, yet something lost by most adults during the course of their life. Why? In a world of Google, robots, and AI, raising a kid that is constantly asking questions and running “what if” experiments can be extremely valuable. In an age of machine learning, massive data, and a trillion sensors, it will be the quality of your questions that will be most important.
Imagination: Entrepreneurs and visionaries imagine the world (and the future) they want to live in, and then they create it. Kids happen to be some of the most imaginative humans around… it’s critical that they know how important and liberating imagination can be.
Critical Thinking: In a world flooded with often-conflicting ideas, baseless claims, misleading headlines, negative news, and misinformation, learning the skill of critical thinking helps find the signal in the noise. This principle is perhaps the most difficult to teach kids.
Grit/Persistence: Grit is defined as “passion and perseverance in pursuit of long-term goals,” and it has recently been widely acknowledged as one of the most important predictors of and contributors to success.”

A Model for the Future of Education
https://singularityhub.com/2018/09/12/a-model-for-the-future-of-education-and-the-tech-shaping-it/
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