What Will Our Society Look Like When Artificial Intelligence Is Everywhere? The view from 2065

“Humans look back at the beginning of the 21st century the way people then looked back at the 18th century: a time of sickness and disaster, where children and loved ones were swept away by diseases. Cholera, lung cancer and river blindness no longer threaten us. By 2065, humans are on the verge of freeing themselves People like Ray Kurzweil, the inventor and author of The Singularity Is Near, are entranced with the idea of living forever. It’s something I’ve always found depressing, but I wouldn’t mind having several lives packed into one. And that seems reachable. “AI won’t lead to immortality, because there will always be accidents,” says Susan Schneider, “but it will lead to extreme life extension.” Of course living longer will be cool only if the world is actually not a hellscape—and if you live in one of the nice parts. “I think [curing diseases] would be wonderful,” she says, “especially if we had cheap energy and were able to end world resource scarcity. I imagine some societies will come closer to achieving that than others.” from the biology that created them.”

What Will Our Society Look Like When Artificial Intelligence Is Everywhere?
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/artificial-intelligence-future-scenarios-180968403/
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How the Government Could Fix Facebook

“Peter Swire, a privacy-law professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology who testified last year in an Irish court on behalf of Facebook, recently laid out the legal case for why Google and Facebook might be regulated as public utilities. Both companies, he argued, satisfy the traditional criteria for utility regulation: They have large market share, are natural monopolies, and are difficult for customers to do without.”

How the Government Could Fix Facebook
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/04/four-ways-to-fix-facebook/557255/
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The Paradox of Universal Basic Income: must-read by Joi Ito

“That would be applauded by libertarians and some conservatives, but not by many others.

Underpinning the Silicon Valley argument for UBI is the belief in exponential growth powered by science and technology, as described by Peter Diamandis in his book Abundance: The Future is Better Than You Think. Diamandis contends that technological progress, including gains in health, the power of computing, and the development of machine intelligence, among other things, will lead to a kind of technological transcendence that makes today’s society look like how we view the Dark Ages. He argues that the human mind is unable to intuitively grasp this idea, and so we constantly underestimate long-term effects. If you plot progress out a few decades, Diamandis writes, we end up with unimaginable abundance: “We will soon have the ability to meet and exceed the basic needs of every man, woman, and child on the planet. Abundance for all is within our grasp.” (Technologists often forget is that we actually already have enough food to feed the world; the problem is that it’s just not properly distributed.)

Many tech billionaires think they can have their cake and eat it too, that they are so rich and smart the trickle-down theory can lift the poor out of poverty without anyone or anything suffering. And why shouldn’t they think so? Their companies and their wealth have grown exponentially, and it doesn’t appear as though there is any end in sight, as Marc Andreessen prophetically predicted in his famous essay, “Why Software is Eating the World.” Most of Silicon Valley’s leaders gained their wealth in an exponentially growing market without having to engage in the aggressive tactics that marked the creation of wealth in the past. They feel their businesses inherently “do good,” and that, I believe, allows them to feel more charitable, broadly speaking.”

The Paradox of Universal Basic Income
https://www.wired.com/story/the-paradox-of-universal-basic-income/
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Facebook Executive In 2016: “Maybe Someone Dies In A Terrorist Attack Coordinated On Our Tools”

“The ugly truth is that we believe in connecting people so deeply that anything that allows us to connect more people more often is *de facto* good. It is perhaps the only area where the metrics do tell the true story as far as we are concerned,” he wrote. “That isn’t something we are doing for ourselves. Or for our stock price (ha!). It is literally just what we do. We connect people. Period.””

Facebook Executive In 2016: “Maybe Someone Dies In A Terrorist Attack Coordinated On Our Tools”
https://www.buzzfeed.com/ryanmac/growth-at-any-cost-top-facebook-executive-defended-data
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Are you ready? This is all the data Facebook and Google have on you | Dylan Curran

“This is one of the craziest things about the modern age. We would never let the government or a corporation put cameras/microphones in our homes or location trackers on us. But we just went ahead and did it ourselves because – to hell with it! – I want to”

Are you ready? This is all the data Facebook and Google have on you | Dylan Curran
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/mar/28/all-the-data-facebook-google-has-on-you-privacy
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Emmanuel Macron Talks to WIRED About France's AI Strategy

“EM: I think artificial intelligence will disrupt all the different business models and it’s the next disruption to come. So I want to be part of it. Otherwise I will just be subjected to this disruption without creating jobs in this country. So that’s where we are. And there is a huge acceleration and as always the winner takes all in this field. So that’s why my first objective in terms of education, training, research, and the creation of startups is to streamline a lot of things, to have the adaptable systems, the adapted financing, the adapted regulations, in order to build champions here and to attract the existing champions.

Laura Stevens”

Emmanuel Macron Talks to WIRED About France's AI Strategy
https://www.wired.com/story/emmanuel-macron-talks-to-wired-about-frances-ai-strategy/
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Mark Zuckerberg Thinks We’re Idiots. Via Monday Note

“As Facebook’s leader, Zuckerberg resolves to get things straightened out in the future (“it’s my job, right?”) while he delivers a callcenter-style broken record reassurance: “Your privacy is important to us”. Yes, of course, our privacy is important to you; you made billions by surveilling and mining our private lives. One wonders how aware Zuckerberg is of the double entendre.”

Mark Zuckerberg Thinks We’re Idiots. – Monday Note
https://mondaynote.com/mark-zuckerberg-thinks-were-idiots-638c64dfab12
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The Tyranny of Convenience - made me think

“In the developed nations of the 21st century, convenience — that is, more efficient and easier ways of doing personal tasks — has emerged as perhaps the most powerful force shaping our individual lives and our economies. This is particularly true in America, where, despite all the paeans to freedom and individuality, one sometimes wonders whether convenience is in fact the supreme value.

As Evan Williams, a co-founder of Twitter, recently put it, “Convenience decides everything.” Convenience seems to make our decisions for us, trumping what we like to imagine are our true preferences. (I prefer to brew my coffee, but Starbucks instant is so convenient I hardly ever do what I “prefer.”) Easy is better, easiest is best.”

Opinion | The Tyranny of Convenience
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/16/opinion/sunday/tyranny-convenience.html
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Opinion | Facebook’s Surveillance Machine

“Mr. Grewal is right: This wasn’t a breach in the technical sense. It is something even more troubling: an all-too-natural consequence of Facebook’s business model, which involves having people go to the site for social interaction, only to be quietly subjected to an enormous level of surveillance. The results of that surveillance are used to fuel a sophisticated and opaque system for narrowly targeting advertisements and other wares to Facebook’s users.”

Opinion | Facebook’s Surveillance Machine
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/19/opinion/facebook-cambridge-analytica.html
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China's Dystopian Tech Could Be Contagious

“Known by the anodyne name “social credit,” this system is designed to reach into every corner of existence both online and off. It monitors each individual’s consumer behavior, conduct on social networks, and real-world infractions like speeding tickets or quarrels with neighbors. Then it integrates them into a single, algorithmically determined “sincerity” score. Every Chinese citizen receives a literal, numeric index of their trustworthiness and virtue, and this index unlocks, well, everything. In principle, anyway, this one number will determine the opportunities citizens are offered, the freedoms they enjoy, and the privileges they are granted.”

China's Dystopian Tech Could Be Contagious
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/02/chinas-dangerous-dream-of-urban-control/553097/
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