When is great technology enough...?

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Point is, a little technology is amazing. But all technology, all the time is dystopia. And strutting and fretting our entire lives digitally is a reduction of the rich possibilities of life beyond the algorithm. Even as the increasingly comprehensive digital footprints we generate are also, clearly, a way too tempting repository for governments and companies to ignore — and so they do the opposite: lift, store and manipulate the substance of our digital lives at will.

Our evolving relationship with technology

“Right now, at the frontier of technology, people are deciding the future of human-computer interaction. The Myo armband is one futuristic input among many. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency for the United States (DARPA) has just announced that they’re developing a “cortical modem,” a direct neural interface that stimulates your visual cortex and displays information without glasses or goggles. It’s a heads-up display that plugs straight into your brain. Equal parts captivating and terrifying.

We believe that any digital input that disregards human biology — as the desktop environment did — can’t succeed in the 21st century. Our bodies are already rebelling against technology’s impact, and any device that asks us to act more like machines — by fundamentally changing our bodies, habits, vocabulary, or how we relate to one another — isn’t a sustainable option.”

Our evolving relationship with technology
http://blog.thalmic.com/the-evolution-of-computing/
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Computers, the Internet, and the Abdication of Consciousness - made me think

“Only if we counter these technologies with a greater power of attention to the specific, the qualitative, the local, the here and now, can we keep our balance. This is the general rule, first voiced, so far as I know, by Rudolf Steiner: To the extent we commit ourselves more fully to a machine-mediated existence, we must reach more determinedly toward the highest regions of our selves; otherwise, we will progressively lose our humanity.”

Computers, the Internet, and the Abdication of Consciousness
http://natureinstitute.org/txt/st/jung.htm
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Internet of Things to be used as spy tool by governments: US intel chief

“In the future, intelligence services might use the loT for identification, surveillance, monitoring, location tracking, and targeting for recruitment, or to gain access to networks or user credentials," Clapper said (PDF), according to his prepared testimony before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.”

Internet of Things to be used as spy tool by governments: US intel chief
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/02/us-intelligence-chief-says-iot-climate-change-add-to-global-instability/
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TED isn't a cult. Here's what attendees actually believe

“Science, philosophy and technology run on the model of American Idol - as embodied by TED talks - is a recipe for civilisational disaster" wrote TED critic Benjamin Bratton for the BBC. TED, he argued, makes solutions to difficult problems seem all-too-easy. "Given the stakes, making our best and brightest waste their time - and the audience's time - dancing like infomercial hosts is too high a price."”

TED isn't a cult. Here's what attendees actually believe
http://www.businessinsider.in/TED-isnt-a-cult-Heres-what-attendees-actually-believe/articleshow/50909731.cms
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Facebook anxiety

“there remain plenty of Facebook detractors. The Kernel shone a baleful light on “Facebook anxiety” comparing the experience of flicking through the curated feeds of friends to that of being an inmate of the infamous Panopticon:
Researchers linked a high number of Facebook friends with feeling burdened or stressed out by the site. our desire to lurk and unhealthily peer into the lives of those around us is built into the experience itself. … the site [is like] an 18th century “panopticon”—a type of prison that allowed inmates to be viewed by guards at all times. “We know what all the prisoners are showing us from their jail cells,””

Week 4 | import digest
https://malm.teqy.net/2016/01/31/week-4-2/
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