Technology extends and also amputates (McLUHAN)

“Technology can be described as an amplifier or an extension of the human body. The hammer is an extension of the fist, the knife is an extension of our teeth, TVs are exaggerated eyes and ears. Marshall McLuhan claimed that every extension results in an auto-amputation of another part.

“Every extension of mankind, especially technological extensions, has the effect of amputating or modifying some other extension[…] The extension of a technology like the automobile ‘amputates’ the need for a highly developed walking culture, which in turn causes cities and countries to develop in different ways. The telephone extends the voice, but also amputates the art of penmanship gained through regular correspondence. These are a few examples, and almost everything we can think of is subject to similar observations…We have become people who regularly praise all extensions, and minimize all amputations.””

Who serves whom? – iA
https://ia.net/topics/who-serves-whom/
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These Technologies Will Shape The Future, According To One Of Silicon Valley’s Top VC Firms

“Although it’s the furthest from changing the world, Evans touts the broad possible impact of autonomy. When the day comes, he says, that cars, buses, and other vehicles no longer need drivers, it’ll be possible to completely re-imagine what those vehicles can be, and even better, re-imagine the world in which they move.

If you don’t have drivers, you can probably have more cars on the roads. There will be almost no accidents as the vehicles move in tandem, always aware of each other, and that will mean different kinds of roads. That, in turn, can lead to all-new urban design–with no need to provide parking spaces, no congestion, dynamic road pricing, and a totally different dynamic around where people live, shop, eat, drink, and so on.”

These Technologies Will Shape The Future, According To One Of Silicon Valley’s Top VC Firms
https://www.fastcompany.com/40502906/these-technologies-will-shape-the-future-according-to-one-of-silicon-valleys-top-vc-firms
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AI is now so complex its creators can’t trust why it makes decisions

“We don’t want to accept arbitrary decisions by entities, people or AIs, that we don’t understand,” said Uber AI researcher Jason Yosinkski, co-organizer of the Interpretable AI workshop. “In order for machine learning models to be accepted by society, we’re going to need to know why they’re making the decisions they’re making.””

AI is now so complex its creators can’t trust why it makes decisions
https://qz.com/1146753/ai-is-now-so-complex-its-creators-cant-trust-why-it-makes-decisions/
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The real risk of automation: boredom

“As we learn to exert ourselves, we seem able to make more habitual applications of effort over time. Effort plays a critical role in human performance; students show better learning outcomes when their work is effortful. Effort is associated with improved wellbeing, demonstrating positive associations with enhanced goal-directed behaviour: we get better at doing what we aim to do, rather than be side-tracked by distraction or temptation.

As we automate more and more number of human tasks, we should consider the value of what we are eliminating. What happens if we miss out on positive experiences associated with effort? Will we lose the ‘effort’ habit in the process, with deleterious effects further down the line?”

The real risk of automation: boredom
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/11/automation-automated-job-risk-robot-bored-boredom-effort-fourth-industrial-revolution/
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The real risk of automation: boredom

“Much low-income, manual work will still require human workers. It will take time to roboticize these roles entirely. For example, automated vehicles will deliver goods to local hubs. But it will be some years until an army of cheap robots is smart enough to navigate the ‘final mile’ through unpredictable entrances, up stairways and into small, rusty letterboxes.”

The real risk of automation: boredom
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/11/automation-automated-job-risk-robot-bored-boredom-effort-fourth-industrial-revolution/
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Mastering the Learning Pyramid - John Hagel

“Skills are about “knowing how.” Knowledge – the second level of the learning pyramid - is about “knowing what.” Our schools tend to focus on broad-based knowledge like history, economics and science that give us a context for understanding the world we live in, but the knowledge here tends to be reduced to facts and figures that can be recited on a test – it truly is about “knowing what” rather than “knowing why.””

Mastering the Learning Pyramid
http://edgeperspectives.typepad.com/edge_perspectives/2017/11/mastering-the-learning-pyramid.html
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A state Supreme Court justice’s open letter to AI

“We’re in for more than just a world of change and evolution. We’re in for some discussion of what it means to be human. At its most ambitious, AI’s promise is to serve as a framework for improving human welfare to make the world more educated, more interesting and full of possibility, more meaningful, and more safe. But once we overcome some technical problems that are more likely than not to get easier to deal with every day, we’re in for more than just a world of change and evolution. We’re in for some discussion of what it means to be human. And we will soon confront big questions that will drive the well-being of our kids and their kids.”

A state Supreme Court justice’s open letter to AI
https://qz.com/1132418/california-supreme-court-justice-mariano-florentino-cuellars-open-letter-to-ai/
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Why AI Is the ‘New Electricity’ - Knowledge@Wharton

““AI is the new electricity,” said Andrew Ng, co-founder of Coursera and an adjunct Stanford professor who founded the Google Brain Deep Learning Project, in a keynote speech at the AI Frontiers conference that was held this past weekend in Silicon Valley. “About 100 years ago, electricity transformed every major industry. AI has advanced to the point where it has the power to transform” every major sector in coming years. And even though there’s a perception that AI was a fairly new development, it has actually been around for decades, he said. But it is taking off now because of the ability to scale data and computation.”

Why AI Is the ‘New Electricity’ - Knowledge@Wharton
http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/ai-new-electricity/
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Can a Society Ruled by Complex Computer Algorithms Let New Ideas In?

“According to post-election BuzzFeed analysis by Craig Silverman, “In the final three months of the US presidential campaign, the top-performing fake election news stories on Facebook generated more engagement [such as shares, reactions and comments] than the top stories from major news outlets such as The New York Times, Washington Post, Huffington Post, NBC News and others.”


Can a Society Ruled by Complex Computer Algorithms Let New Ideas In?
https://medium.reinvent.net/can-a-society-ruled-by-complex-computer-algorithms-let-new-ideas-in-1eae52d6c3e8
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