tag:digitalethics.net,2013:/posts Digital Ethics by FuturistGerd 2021-09-15T10:40:59Z Digital Ethics by Futurist Gerd Leonhard tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1736175 2021-09-15T10:40:58Z 2021-09-15T10:40:59Z The future is frightening ]]> tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1734532 2021-09-11T14:27:09Z 2021-09-11T14:27:10Z Codex AI
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/09/technology/codex-artificial-intelligence-coding.html

Codex, built by OpenAI, one of the world’s most ambitious research labs, provides insight into the state of artificial intelligence. Though a wide range of A.I. technologies have improved by leaps and bounds over the past decade, even the most impressive systems have ended up complementing human workers rather than replacing them.



]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1730759 2021-09-01T21:15:51Z 2021-09-01T21:15:52Z Global summit to end COVID-19
Gerd Leonhard
www.futuristgerd.com
www.gerdtube.com
gerd@hey.com  (personal)
gerd@thefuturesagency.com  (business)
Check my new updates page
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1730130 2021-08-30T20:52:01Z 2021-08-30T20:52:02Z Climate change and capitalism
https://jacobinmag.com/2021/08/capitalism-climate-crisis-global-green-new-deal-clean-energy-fossil-fuel-industry

But whether we deal with climate change or not can’t be held hostage to executives’ ability to turn a profit. To handle this crisis, capitalism will have to be replaced as society’s operating system, setting out goals other than the boundless accumulation of private wealth.

]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1727552 2021-08-23T20:21:00Z 2021-08-24T15:00:33Z Billions are pouring into the business of decarbonisation
“If you walked into a VC boardroom and said you are working on clean tech, the senior partners left the room”

Billions are pouring into the business of decarbonisation
https://www.economist.com/business/billions-are-pouring-into-the-business-of-decarbonisation/21803649
via Instapaper
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1725707 2021-08-18T10:40:19Z 2021-08-18T10:40:19Z American CEOs make 351 times more than workers.

“Today in the US, the CEO-to-worker pay gap stands at a staggering 351 to one, an unacceptable increase from 15 to one in 1965. In other words, the average CEO makes nearly nine times what the average person will earn over a lifetime in just one year.”

American CEOs make 351 times more than workers. In 1965 it was 15 to one | Indigo Olivier http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/aug/17/american-chief-executive-pay-wages-workers via Instapaper

]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1724622 2021-08-15T09:35:35Z 2021-08-15T09:35:35Z Moral attention
https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/22585287/technology-smartphones-gmail-attention-morality


The idea of moral attention goes back at least as far as ancient Greece, where the Stoics wrote about the practice of attention (prosoché) as the cornerstone of a good spiritual life. In modern Western thought, though, ethicists didn’t focus too much on attention until a band of female philosophers came along, starting with Simone Weil.


Weil, an early 20th-century French philosopher and Christian mystic, wrote that “attention is the rarest and purest form of generosity.” She believed that to be able to properly pay attention to someone else — to become fully receptive to their situation in all its complexity — you need to first get your own self out of the way. She called this process “decreation,” and explained: “Attention consists of suspending our thought, leaving it detached, empty ... ready to receive in its naked truth the object that is to penetrate it.”


Weil argued that plain old attention — the kind you use when reading novels, say, or birdwatching — is a precondition for moral attention, which is a precondition for empathy, which is a precondition for ethical action.



]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1722982 2021-08-11T13:23:44Z 2021-08-11T13:23:45Z Kim Stanley Robinson Bears Witness to Our Climate Futures

“The central banks have been creating money out of nothing with quantitative easing, but what if that was directed not to private banks to do their usual stupid thing of profit-making but to do useful work that the central banks designate by some simple rubric of carbon sequestration. When I read it, I thought, maybe that’s a way forward: using an existing system but more intelligently, a long-term biosphere, survivalist-type method.”

Kim Stanley Robinson Bears Witness to Our Climate Futures https://www.thenation.com/article/culture/qa-kim-stanley-robinson/ via Instapaper

]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1721154 2021-08-06T06:48:50Z 2021-08-06T06:48:51Z DeGrowth?
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/02/10/can-we-have-prosperity-without-growth

Once confined to the margins, the ecological critique of economic growth has gained widespread attention. At a United Nations climate-change summit in September, the teen-age Swedish environmental activist Greta Thunberg declared, “We are in the beginning of a mass extinction, and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth. How dare you!” The degrowth movement has its own academic journals and conferences. Some of its adherents favor dismantling the entirety of global capitalism, not just the fossil-fuel industry. Others envisage “post-growth capitalism,” in which production for profit would continue, but the economy would be reorganized along very different lines. In the influential book “Prosperity Without Growth: Foundations for the Economy of Tomorrow,” Tim Jackson, a professor of sustainable development at the University of Surrey, in England, calls on Western countries to shift their economies from mass-market production to local services—such as nursing, teaching, and handicrafts—that could be less resource-intensive. Jackson doesn’t underestimate the scale of the changes, in social values as well as in production patterns, that such a transformation would entail, but he sounds an optimistic note: “People can flourish without endlessly accumulating more stuff. Another world is possible.”



]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1719449 2021-08-01T11:02:00Z 2021-08-01T11:02:01Z Degrowth
https://www.exponentialview.co/ev-333p/


That, ultimately, for degrowth to work, 86% of people living in the richer world would need to see their standard of living decline for a decade or more. This would be politically unacceptable or as Milanovic says “now, the relevance of moral preaching of abstinence is close to zero.” It is a thought-provoking essay. (See also: An exemplary overview of the degrowth movement, read John Cassidy in The New Yorker.)






]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1718886 2021-07-30T17:10:58Z 2021-07-30T17:10:59Z The world is much better; The world is awful; The world can be much better - Our World in Data ]]> tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1717016 2021-07-24T22:29:14Z 2021-07-27T15:38:09Z Read “the ministry of the future’
Gerd Leonhard
www.futuristgerd.com
www.gerdtube.com
gerd@hey.com  (personal)
gerd@thefuturesagency.com  (business)
Check my new updates page
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1715268 2021-07-19T20:39:26Z 2021-07-19T20:39:26Z The LTSE ]]> tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1715242 2021-07-19T19:30:09Z 2021-07-19T19:38:31Z Peak populism
https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/07/peak-populism/619368/


Extremist leaders remain in power in some of the world’s most populous democracies. But even some of those strongmen are now starting to face a real reversal of fortune.


Jair Bolsonaro, a former army captain known for his extremist rhetoric and open nostalgia for Brazil’s departed military dictatorship, unexpectedly assumed the country’s presidency in 2019. But he is now in deep political trouble. Lacking loyal allies in the country’s Congress, Bolsonaro has so far proved unable to concentrate power and, thanks to his disastrous mishandling of the coronavirus pandemic, his popularity has plummeted. Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, a former president better known simply as Lula, is likely to beat Bolsonaro in an upcoming election.




]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1705114 2021-06-19T14:34:28Z 2021-06-19T14:34:28Z Central bank digital currencies ?
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/06/01/proceed-with-caution-central-bank-digital-currency/

The risk is, or should be, obvious: We do not want to create a system that would give government access, in real time, to detailed information about every single transaction its individual citizens might conduct.


]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1702469 2021-06-12T17:11:29Z 2021-06-12T17:11:29Z The global carbon incentive idea
https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/global-carbon-incentive-for-reducing-emissions-by-raghuram-rajan-2021-05

The economic solution is simple: a global carbon incentive (GCI). Every country that emits more than the global average of around five tons per capita would pay annually into a global incentive fund, with the amount calculated by multiplying the excess emissions per capita by the population and the GCI. If the GCI started at $10 per ton, the US would pay around $36 billion, and Saudi Arabia would pay $4.6 billion.


Gerd Leonhard
www.futuristgerd.com
www.gerdtube.com
gerd@hey.com  (personal)
gerd@thefuturesagency.com  (business)
Check my new updates page
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1698645 2021-06-03T21:42:02Z 2021-06-03T21:42:02Z ‘Change is Coming.’ Activists Just Scored Big Wins Against ExxonMobil, Chevron and Shell
“And while many energy companies have been willing to reduce emissions in their own operations, they have avoided committing to reducing Scope 3 emissions because it could one day ultimately meaning selling less of their core product rather than just producing it more efficiently.”

‘Change is Coming.’ Activists Just Scored Big Wins Against ExxonMobil, Chevron and Shell
https://time.com/6051404/exxonmobil-board-chevron-shell/
via Instapaper
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1684482 2021-04-28T11:07:30Z 2021-06-03T21:47:00Z The EU is considering a ban on AI for mass surveillance and social credit scores
“The creation of a “European Artificial Intelligence Board,” consisting of representatives from every nation-state, to help the commission decide which AI systems count as “high-risk” and to recommend changes to prohibitions”

The EU is considering a ban on AI for mass surveillance and social credit scores
https://www.theverge.com/2021/4/14/22383301/eu-ai-regulation-draft-leak-surveillance-social-credit
via Instapaper
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1680070 2021-04-18T09:37:36Z 2021-04-18T09:37:36Z 🔮 AI ethics; Amazon’s good and bad; The cold-hot war; Climate change on Google Earth
“In its unending quest to be the smart city of the future, Dubai signed a contract with US manufacturer Cruise for a fleet of electric autonomous taxis. The Emirate says they will be deployed from 2023 (I would expect some delays). The city will make a fascinating test case for this technology because it is famously home to more than 200 nationalities (and driving styles). The programme should produce a mountain of data for the autonomous car sector.”

🔮 AI ethics; Amazon’s good and bad; The cold-hot war; Climate change on Google Earth & Psilocybin as an antidepressant ++ #318
https://www.exponentialview.co/p/ev-318
via Instapaper
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1679555 2021-04-16T21:55:38Z 2021-04-16T21:55:38Z Algoritmos não podem aprender sentimentos, diz futurólogo Gerd Leonhard | Suplementos | Valor Econômico

https://valor.globo.com/publicacoes/suplementos/noticia/2021/04/14/algoritmos-nao-podem-aprender-sentimentos-diz-futurologo-gerd-leonhard.ghtml

Valor: A inteligência artificial faz frente à inteligência humana?

Gerd Leonhard: As máquinas, essencialmente, usam zeros e uns, encontrando padrões e respondendo a eles. Isso é chamado de “machine learning” ou “deep learning”. Os humanos, na verdade, não aprendem a partir de padrões, porque são inteligentes de dez diferentes formas. Há questões como felicidade e consciência que são difíceis de ser definidas. Quando se fala de inteligência humana, muitas vezes nos referimos a um só tipo de inteligência, mas há a inteligência criativa, musical e cinestésica, entre outras. As máquinas só têm uma inteligência, que é a computação, o processamento. Um computador pode ler todos os livros de filosofia em todos os idiomas em poucos minutos, mas isso não fará dele um filósofo. Os computadores têm os dados e nada mais.

]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1674438 2021-04-04T09:13:26Z 2021-04-04T09:13:26Z Reinvent Education As Well As Creating Greater Access
“Even more horrifying, the whole system is preparing kids for the wrong jobs: The basic idea of the education system in the 20th Century was that if you worked hard at school and finished your education you were set for life with a good job. The problem is that most of today's jobs won't exist tomorrow and most of tomorrow's jobs don't exist today. Kids will probably end up having many different jobs throughout their lives.”

Reinvent Education As Well As Creating Greater Access
https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2020/06/28/reinvent-education-ahead-of-creating-greater-access/?sh=56a9f3bb61ed
via Instapaper
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1642773 2021-01-20T20:40:17Z 2021-01-27T19:15:54Z Rethinking Friedman: Imagining a More Inclusive Capitalism
“think of d.light, a company started in 2007 to bring off-grid solar electricity to 1.5 billion people who lived in the dark after sunset. That level of energy poverty resulted in leaving a huge swath of people without the fundamental building block to create real change in their lives. Imagine the limitations of your prospects if you lacked the power of electricity.

Two young entrepreneurs — Sam Goldman and Ned Tozun — set out to change that. They understood that making markets work for the poor takes time. More importantly, it would take moral imagination. Only by understanding the poor as customers and building solutions from their perspectives could there be a chance of success. d.light had investors — Acumen was amongst the earliest — but we all understood their priority was serving low-income people in broken markets. Financial returns to shareholders would have to wait — more than a decade, as it turned out. But think of what those returns generated in terms of human energy unleashed: jobs, productivity, human connection, better health and a cleaner, more sustainable environment.”

Rethinking Friedman: Imagining a More Inclusive Capitalism
https://jnovogratz.medium.com/rethinking-friedman-imagining-a-more-inclusive-capitalism-60ab1e43f8d7
via Instapaper
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1635200 2021-01-03T14:49:56Z 2021-01-03T14:51:15Z How Germany and Costa Rica are putting nature at the heart of their recoveries: a balanced relationship with nature
“First we need to understand the direct relationship between pandemics and zoonosis (transmission of animal-human diseases),” says Rodriguez. “Only by establishing a balanced relationship with nature can we see key benefits such as improved quality of jobs, food and water security, as well as improved human health.””

How Germany and Costa Rica are putting nature at the heart of their recoveries
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/09/costa-rica-germany-nature-based-policy/
via Instapaper
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1634194 2020-12-31T17:05:36Z 2020-12-31T17:05:37Z The year of divergence
“The first is to make big, powerful firms mightier—often because those firms provide products and services on which the self-isolation experiment relied. What used to be a convenience—Amazon’s home delivery, Microsoft’s cloud-based office software, Zoom’s video calls, an evening with Netflix—became a necessity, for remote work during the day and a tolerable life afterwards. Weak companies—or ones that looked strong only thanks to book-cooking—were exposed for what there were, and fell by the wayside.”

The year of divergence
https://www.economist.com/business/2020/12/29/the-year-of-divergence
via Instapaper
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1629886 2020-12-20T09:42:45Z 2020-12-20T09:42:45Z The Uncanny Valley Vertigo
“We experience vertigo in the uncanny valley because we’ve spent hundreds of thousands of years fine-tuning our nervous systems to read and respond to the subtlest cues in real faces. We perceive when someone’s eyes squint into a smile, or how their face flushes from the cheeks to the forehead, and we also — at least subconsciously — perceive the absence of these organic barometers. Simulations make us feel like we’re engaged with the nonliving, and that’s creepy.”

The Uncanny Valley Is Our Best Defense
https://medium.com/team-human/the-uncanny-valley-is-our-best-defense-9006f87d3647
via Instapaper
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1591917 2020-09-07T19:48:02Z 2020-09-07T19:48:02Z Buckminster Fuller | How he anticipated today's challenges 50 years ago
“Talking about the role of humans versus computers:

“Man is going to be displaced altogether as a specialist by the computer. Man himself is being forced to reestablish, employ, and enjoy his innate “comprehensivity.”
– Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth (1963)”

Buckminster Fuller | How he anticipated today's challenges 50 years ago
https://rossdawson.com/futurist/best-futurists-ever/buckminster-fuller/
via Instapaper
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1590485 2020-09-03T21:11:27Z 2020-09-03T21:11:27Z The Privileged Have Entered Their Escape Pods
“The more advanced the tech, the more cocooned insularity it affords.”

The Privileged Have Entered Their Escape Pods
https://onezero.medium.com/the-privileged-have-entered-their-escape-pods-4706b4893af7
via Instapaper
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1587620 2020-08-27T14:25:30Z 2020-08-27T14:25:30Z Why efficiency is dangerous and slowing down makes life better | Psyche Ideas
“A decade ago, the American psychologist Adam Grant and I argued in a journal paper that this ‘too much of a good thing’ phenomenon might be a general rule. Some motivation produces excellent performance; too much motivation produces choking. Some group collaboration produces cohesion and enhances productivity; too much of it leads to staleness. Some empathy enables you to understand what another person is going through; too much could prevent you from saying and doing hard things. Similarly, in my book The Paradox of Choice (2004), I argued that, whereas a life with no freedom to choose is not worth living, a life with too much choice leads to paralysis, bad decisions and dissatisfaction. Finding the right amount – what Aristotle called the ‘mean’ – of motivation, collaboration, empathy, choice and many other aspects of life, including efficiency, is a key challenge we face, both as individuals and as a society.”

Why efficiency is dangerous and slowing down makes life better | Psyche Ideas
https://psyche.co/ideas/why-efficiency-is-dangerous-and-slowing-down-makes-life-better
via Instapaper
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1585633 2020-08-22T11:31:44Z 2020-08-22T11:31:44Z Best-of-Online-Keynotes Compilation: Virtual Keynote Speaker & Futurist ...
]]>
tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1582342 2020-08-09T16:10:02Z 2020-08-09T20:37:40Z The Other Global Power Shift | by Joseph S. Nye, Jr. - Project Syndicate
“The spread of information means that power is more widely distributed, and informal networks can undercut the monopoly of traditional bureaucracy. And the speed of online transmission of information means that governments have less control over their agendas, and citizens face new vulnerabilities.”

The Other Global Power Shift | by Joseph S. Nye, Jr. - Project Syndicate
https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/new-technology-threats-to-us-national-security-by-joseph-s-nye-2020-08
via Instapaper
]]>