tag:digitalethics.net,2013:/posts Digital Ethics by FuturistGerd 2017-06-25T18:56:20Z Digital Ethics by Futurist Gerd Leonhard tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1167410 2017-06-25T18:56:19Z 2017-06-25T18:56:20Z The Real Threat of Artificial Intelligence - 5* read by Kai-Fu Lee
“One way or another, we are going to have to start thinking about how to minimize the looming A.I.-fueled gap between the haves and the have-nots, both within and between nations. Or to put the matter more optimistically: A.I. is presenting us with an opportunity to rethink economic inequality on a global scale. These challenges are too far-ranging in their effects for any nation to isolate itself from the rest of the world.

Kai-Fu Lee is the chairman and chief executive of Sinovation Ventures, a venture capital firm, and the president of its Artificial Intelligence Institute.”

Opinion | The Real Threat of Artificial Intelligence
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/24/opinion/sunday/artificial-intelligence-economic-inequality.html
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1167367 2017-06-25T16:19:52Z 2017-06-25T16:19:53Z Inequality boosted by AI - must read links via Azeem Azhar
“Economic growth has gone hand in hand with rising inequality for more than 9,000 years. Inequalities have only narrowed through war or plague. History offers very little comfort to those in search of peaceful leveling. Is there one? (See also Piketty's 2014 essay, a global, progressive wealth tax is the best solution to spiraling inequality.)

🗜️ The real threat of AI. Kai-Fu Lee: "most of the money being made from artificial intelligence will go to the United States and China. A.I. is an industry in which strength begets strength … [other nations] will essentially become [those] country’s economic dependent, taking in welfare subsidies in exchange for letting the “parent” nation’s A.I. companies continue to profit. A.I. is presenting us with an opportunity to rethink economic inequality on a global scale.””

🔮 Uber and leadership; emotions at work; Apple's secrecy; quantum computing; McJobs, and electric planes ++ #119
http://mailchi.mp/exponentialview/ev119?e=19e1d53fe6
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1166752 2017-06-23T07:28:12Z 2017-06-23T07:28:12Z Is it unethical to design robots to resemble humans? Great story on anthropomorphization
“And so the more we humanize chatbots, virtual assistants, and machines, the more we in turn display human emotions toward them. This is the process of anthropomorphism, whereby inanimate objects are attributed with human emotions, traits, and intentions. When something appears alive, it is in our nature to view it through a human lens. Now that many AIs and conversational bots have the illusion of being self-aware, they therefore trigger emotional responses in their users as if they were human. If the despised printer in Office Space had resembled a human (or a living animal, for that matter), our feelings toward both the object and the violent perpetrators would be altered. That’s why many people cringe when they see Boston Dynamics’ robotic dog getting kicked.”

Is it unethical to design robots to resemble humans?
https://qz.com/1010828/is-it-unethical-to-design-robots-to-resemble-humans/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1166383 2017-06-22T06:57:12Z 2017-06-22T06:57:12Z The big lesson from Amazon and Whole Foods: Disruptive competition comes out of nowhere - Vivek Wadhwa
“Note the march of Amazon. First it was bookstores, publishing and distribution; then cleaning supplies, electronics and assorted home goods. Now Amazon is set to dominate all forms of retail as well as cloud services, electronic gadgetry and small-business lending. And its proposed acquisition of Whole Foods sees Amazon literally breaking the barriers between the digital and physical realms.

This is the type of disruption we will see in almost every industry over the next decade, as technologies advance and converge and turn the incumbents into toast. We have experienced the advances in our computing devices, with smartphones having greater computing power than yesterday’s supercomputers. Now, every technology with a computing base is advancing on an exponential curve — including sensors, artificial intelligence, robotics, synthetic biology and 3-D printing. And when technologies converge, they allow industries to encroach on one another.”

The big lesson from Amazon and Whole Foods: Disruptive competition comes out of nowhere - Vivek Wadhwa
http://wadhwa.com/2017/06/21/big-lesson-amazon-whole-foods-disruptive-competition-comes-nowhere/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1165827 2017-06-20T15:33:59Z 2017-06-24T09:21:27Z Digital ethics and the future of humans in a connected world @gleonhard Tedx Brussels
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1165823 2017-06-20T15:30:59Z 2017-06-20T15:33:58Z NEX Prague Conference Keynote with Gerd Leonhard

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1165299 2017-06-19T08:00:31Z 2017-06-19T08:00:32Z Carmageddon is Coming – Future Crunch – Medium
“An overlapping confluence of three different technological waves — the smartphone, the electric battery and artificial intelligence — have created the conditions for a technological disruption so profound it’s going to change almost everything about the way we move in modern society.”

Carmageddon is Coming – Future Crunch – Medium
https://medium.com/future-crunch/carmageddon-is-coming-899c0f05a2a
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1165277 2017-06-19T07:04:07Z 2017-06-19T07:04:07Z Google, not GCHQ, is the truly chilling spy network | John Naughton - food for thought !
“one of the spooks with whom I discussed Snowden’s revelations waxed indignant about our coverage of the story. What bugged him (pardon the pun) was the unfairness of having state agencies pilloried, while firms such as Google and Facebook, which, in his opinion, conducted much more intensive surveillance than the NSA or GCHQ, got off scot free. His argument was that he and his colleagues were at least subject to some degree of democratic oversight, but the companies, whose business model is essentially “surveillance capitalism”, were entirely unregulated.

He was right. “Surveillance”, as the security expert Bruce Schneier has observed, is the business model of the internet and that is true of both the public and private sectors. Given how central the network has become to our lives, that means our societies have embarked on the greatest uncontrolled experiment in history. Without really thinking about it, we have subjected ourselves to relentless, intrusive, comprehensive surveillance of all our activities and much of our most intimate actions and thoughts. And we have no idea what the long-term implications of this will be for our societies – or for us"

Google, not GCHQ, is the truly chilling spy network | John Naughton
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jun/18/google-not-gchq--truly-chilling-spy-network
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1164831 2017-06-17T18:29:34Z 2017-06-17T18:29:34Z Why you should manage your energy, not your time
“In the absence of clear indicators of what it means to be productive and valuable in their jobs, many workers turn back toward an industrial indicator of productivity: doing lots of stuff in a visible manner,” says Newport.”

Why you should manage your energy, not your time
http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20170612-why-you-should-manage-your-energy-not-your-time
via Instapaper
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1164603 2017-06-16T17:26:56Z 2017-06-20T15:03:52Z The Amazon-Walmart Showdown That Explains the Modern Economy / must read via NYT
“Each one is trying to become more like the other — Walmart by investing heavily in its technology, Amazon by opening physical bookstores and now buying physical supermarkets. But this is more than a battle between two business titans. Their rivalry sheds light on the shifting economics of nearly every major industry, replete with winner-take-all effects and huge advantages that accrue to the biggest and best-run organizations, to the detriment of upstarts and second-fiddle players.

That in turn has been a boon for consumers but also has more worrying implications for jobs, wages and inequality.”

The Amazon-Walmart Showdown That Explains the Modern Economy
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/16/upshot/the-amazon-walmart-showdown-that-explains-the-modern-economy.html
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1164213 2017-06-15T12:52:02Z 2017-06-15T12:52:05Z Ethical Innovation Means Giving Consumers a Say | WIRED
“Increasingly, the people and companies with the technological or scientific ability to create new products or innovations are de facto making policy decisions that affect human safety and society. But these decisions are often based on the creator’s intent for the product, and they don't always take into account its potential risks and unforeseen uses. What if gene-editing is diverted for terrorist ends? What if human-pig chimeras mate? What if citizens prefer to see birds rather than flying cars when they look out a window? (Apparently, this is a real risk. Uber plans to offer flight-hailing apps by 2020.) What if Echo Look leads to mental health issues for teenagers? Who bears responsibility for the consequences?”

Ethical Innovation Means Giving Consumers a Say | WIRED
https://www.wired.com/story/innovation-ethically/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1163912 2017-06-14T17:47:35Z 2017-06-14T17:47:35Z Ethical Innovation Means Giving Consumers a Say | WIRED
“Increasingly, the people and companies with the technological or scientific ability to create new products or innovations are de facto making policy decisions that affect human safety and society. But these decisions are often based on the creator’s intent for the product, and they don't always take into account its potential risks and unforeseen uses. What if gene-editing is diverted for terrorist ends? What if human-pig chimeras mate? What if citizens prefer to see birds rather than flying cars when they look out a window? (Apparently, this is a real risk. Uber plans to offer flight-hailing apps by 2020.) What if Echo Look leads to mental health issues for teenagers? Who bears responsibility for the consequences?”

Ethical Innovation Means Giving Consumers a Say | WIRED
https://www.wired.com/story/innovation-ethically/
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1163501 2017-06-13T12:11:58Z 2017-06-13T12:11:59Z Futurist David Brin: Be a Proxy activist !
Be a proxy activist

Brin believes everyone should be a proxy activist. That means you find half a dozen nonprofit organizations to give $50 a month to, like the Electronic Frontier Foundation or others that represent your point of view. Fail to do so and “you’re a bad person,” in his view. The same way nonprofits help tackle issues of injustice, he says these organizations can help keep the sort of AI that seeks to rule humans at bay.”

Futurist David Brin: Get ready for the ‘first robotic empathy crisis’
https://venturebeat.com/2017/06/03/futurist-david-brin-get-ready-for-the-first-robotic-empathy-crisis/
via Instapaper

I kinda do that already :)
Nice meme, David 

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1162140 2017-06-09T13:58:21Z 2017-06-09T13:58:21Z Tim Cook says Apple is not behind on artificial intelligence - and talks tech vs human !
“When technological advancement can go up so exponentially I do think there’s a risk of losing sight of the fact that tech should serve humanity, not the other way around.””

Tim Cook says Apple is not behind on artificial intelligence
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/608051/tim-cook-technology-should-serve-humanity-not-the-other-way-around/
via Instapaper

Heard that somewhere before :)



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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1159918 2017-06-02T07:29:27Z 2017-06-02T15:30:42Z How He (Donald Trump) Used Facebook to Win - incredible story !
“In the early phase of the primaries, Parscale launched Trump’s digital operation by buying $2 million in Facebook ads—his entire budget at the time. He then uploaded all known Trump supporters into the Facebook advertising platform and, using a Facebook tool called Custom Audiences from Customer Lists, matched actual supporters with their virtual doppelgangers and then, using another Facebook tool, parsed them by race, ethnicity, gender, location, and other identities and affinities. From there he used Facebook’s Lookalike Audiences tool to find people with interests and qualities similar to those of his original cohort and developed ads based on those characteristics, which he tested using Facebook’s Brand Lift surveys. He was just getting started. Eventually, Parscale’s shop was reportedly spending $70 million a month on digital advertising, most of it on Facebook. (Facebook and other online venues also netted Trump at least $250 million in donations.)

While it may not have created individual messages for every voter, the Trump campaign used Facebook’s vast reach, relatively low cost, and rapid turnaround to test tens of thousands and sometimes hundreds of thousands of different campaign ads. According to Issie Lapowsky of Wired, speaking with Gary Coby, director of advertising at the Republican National Committee and a member of Trump’s digital team:

On any given day…the campaign was running 40,000 to 50,000 variants of its ads, testing how they performed in different formats, with subtitles and without, and static versus video, among other small differences. On the day of the third presidential debate in October, the team ran 175,000 variations. Coby calls this approach “A/B testing on steroids.””

How He Used Facebook to Win
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2017/06/08/how-trump-used-facebook-to-win/
via Instapaper


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1159863 2017-06-02T03:57:14Z 2017-06-02T03:57:14Z The industry of inequality: why the world is obsessed with private security (The Guardian)
“The global market for private security services, which include private guarding, surveillance and armed transport, is now worth an estimated $180bn (£140bn), and is projected to grow to $240bn by 2020. This far outweighs the total international aid budget to end global poverty ($140bn a year) – and the GDPs of more than 100 countries, including Hungary and Morocco.”

The industry of inequality: why the world is obsessed with private security
http://www.theguardian.com/inequality/2017/may/12/industry-of-inequality-why-world-is-obsessed-with-private-security
via Instapaper
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1159854 2017-06-02T03:04:48Z 2017-06-02T03:04:48Z Technology is making the world more unequal. Only technology can fix this? Says Cory Doctorow
“Smart unequal societies prevent collapse by convincing their elites to hand over some of their earnings to the rest of the country, producing broadly shared prosperity and a sense of national solidarity that transcends class resentments (see, for example, Sweden).

With enough inequality over enough time, the cherished idiocies of the ruling elites will eventually cause a collapse”

Technology is making the world more unequal. Only technology can fix this
http://www.theguardian.com/inequality/2017/may/31/technology-is-making-the-world-more-unequal-only-technology-can-fix-this-cory-doctorow
via Instapaper
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1158922 2017-05-30T16:06:16Z 2017-06-02T03:58:05Z Barack Obama on food and climate change: ‘We can still act and it won’t be too late’ - brilliant stuff (via TheGuardian)
“During the course of my presidency, I made climate change a top priority, because I believe that, for all the challenges that we face, this is the one that will define the contours of this century more dramatically perhaps than the others. No nation, whether it’s large or small, rich or poor, will be immune from the impacts of climate change. We are already experiencing it in America, where some cities are seeing floods on sunny days, where wildfire seasons are longer and more dangerous, where in our arctic state, Alaska, we’re seeing rapidly eroding shorelines, and glaciers receding at a pace unseen in modern times.”

Barack Obama on food and climate change: ‘We can still act and it won’t be too late’
http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2017/may/26/barack-obama-food-climate-change
via Instapaper

Here's my take on this 

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1158552 2017-05-29T17:47:48Z 2017-05-29T17:47:49Z Google now knows when its users go to the store and buy stuff (Wapo story)
“Google has begun using billions of credit-card transaction records to prove that its online ads are prompting people to make purchases – even when they happen offline in brick-and-mortar stores, the company said Tuesday.

The advance allows Google to determine how many sales have been generated by digital ad campaigns, a goal that industry insiders have long described as “the holy grail” of online advertising. But the announcement also renewed long-standing privacy complaints about how the company uses personal information.

To power its multibillion-dollar advertising juggernaut, Google already analyzes users’ Web browsing, search history and geographic locations, using data from popular Google-owned apps like YouTube, Gmail, Google Maps and the Google Play store. All that information is tied to the real identities of users when they log into Google’s services.

The new credit-card data enables the tech giant to connect these digital trails to real-world purchase records in a far more extensive way than was possible before. But in doing so, Google is yet again treading in territory that consumers may consider too intimate and potentially sensitive. Privacy advocates said few people understand that their purchases are being analyzed in this way and could feel uneasy, despite assurances from Google that it has taken steps to protect the personal information of its users.”

Google now knows when its users go to the store and buy stuff
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2017/05/23/google-now-knows-when-you-are-at-a-cash-register-and-how-much-you-are-spending/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1158184 2017-05-28T14:34:40Z 2017-05-28T14:34:41Z The long, winding road for driverless cars - must read via The Econmist
“Level 3 autonomous driving is even more controversial. The main difference is that, while the driver must still remain vigilant and ready to intervene in an emergency, responsibility for all the critical safety functions is shifted from the driver to the car. This has a lot of engineers worried. Experience has not been good with control systems that relegate the operator to a managerial role outside the feedback loop, with the sole function of interceding in the case of an emergency.

It was this sort of thinking that allowed an accident at a nuclear power plant at Three Mile Island, in 1979, to escalate into a full-blown meltdown. Plant operators failed to react correctly when a valve stuck open and caused the reactor to lose cooling water. They then made matters worse by overriding the automatic emergency cooling system, thinking there was too much water in the reactor rather than too little. The accident report blamed inadequate operator training and a poorly designed computer interface.

Similar human failings have led to countless airline accidents—most recently, the Asiana Airlines crash at San Francisco in 2013. Over-reliance on automation and lack of systems understanding by the pilots when they needed to interevene were cited as major factors contributing to the Asiana crash. Some carmakers fear that—even more than reactor operators or professional pilots—untrained motorists may only compound the problem when suddenly required to take control of an otherwise fully automated system. Ford believes it is better to skip Level 3 altogether, and go straight to Level 4, even if it takes longer.”

The long, winding road for driverless cars
http://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21722628-forget-hype-about-autonomous-vehicles-being-around-cornerreal-driverless-cars-will
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1157305 2017-05-25T14:49:33Z 2017-05-25T14:49:34Z 'Westworld,' 'Black Mirror' and other tech-driven shows delve into what it means to be human
“Sticky big-picture questions like that are meat and potatoes this season for such series as "Humans," HBO's "Westworld," USA's "Mr. Robot" and Netflix's "Black Mirror." At first glance, these shows may seem to be about subservient robots, murderous mechanical bees or modern-day computer hackers who aspire to change the world with their code, but dismiss them as "mere" science fiction at your peril. They feature some of the most philosophically complex, thoughtful storytelling on TV, and even though they take place in alternative future universes, they are relevant to today's tech-obsessed world.”

'Westworld,' 'Black Mirror' and other tech-driven shows delve into what it means to be human
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/la-en-st-technology-on-tv-20170525-story.html
via Instapaper






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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1156986 2017-05-24T12:37:45Z 2017-05-24T12:37:46Z Instagram is the most harmful social network for your mental health
“Our addictive feeds of fitness models, exotic travel, and photo-perfect moments don’t often match with our comparatively humdrum and badly lit lives. The discontent caused by that disconnect is enough that a growing body of research suggests social media is contributing to mental-health problems such as anxiety, depression, sleep deprivation, and body-image issues in young people, who are the heaviest users of social media.”

Instagram is the most harmful social network for your mental health
https://qz.com/988765/instagram-fb-is-the-most-harmful-social-network-for-your-mental-health-but-youtube-goog-has-a-positive-effect-a-new-report-says/
via Instapaper
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1156512 2017-05-23T05:24:19Z 2017-05-23T05:24:19Z Elon Musk wants to enhance us as superhuman cyborgs to deal with superintelligent AI (madness imho)
“But for Musk, the big concern is AI safety. “AI is obviously going to surpass human intelligence by a lot,” he says. “There’s some risk at that point that something bad happens, something that we can’t control, that humanity can’t control after that point — either a small group of people monopolize AI power, or the AI goes rogue, or something like that.”

“This is what keeps Elon up at night,” says Urban. “He sees it as only a matter of time before superintelligent AI rises up on this planet — and when that happens, he believes that it’s critical that we don’t end up as part of ‘everyone else.’ That’s why, in a future world made up of AI and everyone else, he thinks we have only one good option: To be AI.””

Elon Musk wants to enhance us as superhuman cyborgs to deal with superintelligent AI | KurzweilAI
http://www.kurzweilai.net/elon-musk-wants-to-enhance-us-as-superhuman-cyborgs-to-deal-with-superintelligent-ai
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1156154 2017-05-22T06:55:11Z 2017-05-22T06:55:12Z The great digital-age swindle… and the man fighting back - interesting read
"But of course there is no such thing as free information. Someone has to pay for it. Just not Google or Facebook. And with the free information that they were using from elsewhere, these twin behemoths built themselves into the biggest advertising sales companies the world has ever seen. From 2000 to 2014, US advertising revenue fell from $65.8bn to $23.6bn, Taplin documents in his book. And between 2007 and 2013, UK ad revenues went from $4.7bn to $2.6bn. But from 2003 to 2015, Google’s revenue went from $1.5bn to an astronomical $74.5bn.

In other words, the companies supplying the “free” information were devastated, while those exploiting it were massively rewarded. But isn’t that just the way of history? Aren’t those who complain just modern versions of the wagon wheel manufacturers decrying the arrival of the automobile?”

The great digital-age swindle… and the man fighting back
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/21/jonathan-taplin-interview-move-fast-break-things-facebook-google-amazon-dylan-scorsese
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1155219 2017-05-19T14:40:30Z 2017-05-19T14:40:31Z Is There an AI President in Our Future? That Might Be an Upgrade??
“Given some of the recent occupants of the White House, many might consider it an upgrade. After all, humans are prone to making decisions based on ego, anger, and the need for self-aggrandizement, not the common good. An artificially intelligent president could be trained to maximize happiness for the most people without infringing on civil liberties. It might even learn that it’s a good idea to tweet less—or not at all.

Sure, on first glance the idea is far-fetched and a little bit ridiculous. It’s not clear, for example, how an algorithm, no matter how lucid, could host a state dinner. Still, AI politicians are the likely culmination of trends already underway. Think about cars. Tesla owners are thrilled to let their Model S’s drive themselves, and auto manufacturers are rushing to produce vehicles that won’t even have steering wheels. Within a decade, tens of thousands of people will entrust their daily commute—and their safety—to an algorithm, and they’ll do it happily.


Why? Because it will make their lives better. Instead of sitting in traffic, drivers—now passengers—can watch a movie or get some work done. The increase in human productivity and happiness will be enormous. At the same time, it’ll make us safer. More than 30,000 people die in traffic accidents every year in the US alone, and almost all of those deaths are attributable to human error. Self-driving cars are poised to reduce that number significantly.”

Is There an AI President in Our Future? That Might Be an Upgrade
https://www.wired.com/2017/05/hear-lets-elect-ai-president/
via Instapaper


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1152641 2017-05-09T05:23:03Z 2017-05-09T05:23:04Z Algorithms are failing Facebook. Can humanity save it? Via Quartz
“Facebook wanted to be pipes, but it’s also people

Early in the company’s history, Zuckerberg referred to Facebook as a “utility,” a piece of “information infrastructure.” In a letter to potential shareholders in 2012, he compared the social network to the printing press and the television.

But television manufacturers and printing press makers have no reason to understand the difference between a historical photo and a piece of pornography, to consider how to classify photos of breastfeeding mothers, or to debate whether an exception should be made for Donald Trump’s hate speech. They merely make the tools for distributing content.

Facebook, on the other hand, built both a content-distribution platform and a global community—”social infrastructure,” as Zuckerberg more recently described it—and its role in that community ended up being both toolmaker and governing institution. Facebook doesn’t just enable communication, but sets the boundaries and rules around it. And its influence—whether on culture, on elections, or on anything else beyond its own digital borders—means that those decisions impact us all, whether or not we use Facebook.”

Algorithms are failing Facebook. Can humanity save it?
https://qz.com/977297/facebook-live-murders-algorithms-are-failing-facebook-can-humanity-save-it/
via Instapaper




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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1150085 2017-04-28T13:42:44Z 2017-04-28T13:42:44Z How Elon Musk learns faster and better than everyone else - 5* read!
“Bottom line: It’s not magic. It’s just the right learning process

Now, we can begin to understand how Musk has become a world-class expert-generalist:

He spent many years reading 60 times as much as an avid reader
He read widely across different disciplines
He constantly applied what he learned by deconstructing ideas into their fundamental principles and reconstructing them in new ways
At the deepest level, what we can learn from Musk’s story is that we shouldn’t accept the dogma that specialization is the best or only path toward career success and impact. Legendary expert-generalist Buckminster Fuller summarizes a shift in thinking we should all consider. He shared it decades ago, but it’s just as relevant today:

“We are in an age that assumes that the narrowing trends of specialization to be logical, natural, and desirable… In the meantime, humanity has been deprived of comprehensive understanding. Specialization has bred feelings of isolation, futility, and confusion in individuals. It has also resulted in the individual’s leaving responsibility for thinking and social action to others. Specialization breeds biases that ultimately aggregate as international and ideological discord, which in turn leads to war.”

If we put in the time and learn core concepts across fields and always relate those concepts back to our life and the world, transferring between areas becomes much easier and faster.”

How Elon Musk learns faster and better than everyone else
https://qz.com/968101/how-elon-musk-learns-faster-and-better-than-everyone-else/
via Instapaper



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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1150048 2017-04-28T10:58:17Z 2017-04-28T10:58:18Z The Myth of a Superhuman AI – good points via Kevin Kelly
“The assumptions behind a superhuman intelligence arising soon are:

Artificial intelligence is already getting smarter than us, at an exponential rate.
We’ll make AIs into a general purpose intelligence, like our own.
We can make human intelligence in silicon.
Intelligence can be expanded without limit.
Once we have exploding superintelligence it can solve most of our problems.
In contradistinction to this orthodoxy, I find the following five heresies to have more evidence to support them.

Intelligence is not a single dimension, so “smarter than humans” is a meaningless concept.
Humans do not have general purpose minds, and neither will AIs.
Emulation of human thinking in other media will be constrained by cost.
Dimensions of intelligence are not infinite.
Intelligences are only one factor in progress.”

The Myth of a Superhuman AI – Backchannel
https://backchannel.com/the-myth-of-a-superhuman-ai-59282b686c62
via Instapaper

Totally spot-on!

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1150040 2017-04-28T10:29:00Z 2017-04-28T10:29:00Z The one crucial skill our education system is missing
“The answer is precisely that element which makes us less efficient and slower. Our humanity. But rather than being seen as a weakness, this is actually our strongest suit. It’s one we need to empower, because studies show that as the world becomes increasingly automated, computerised and digitalised, we are losing the very skills that define us as human. Just when we need them the most.”

The one crucial skill our education system is missing
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/04/one-crucial-skill/
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1148600 2017-04-23T16:59:03Z 2017-04-23T16:59:04Z Smartphones are the New Cigarettes (via Mark Manson)
“I would say that our ability to focus and hone our attention on what we need is a core component of living a happy, healthy life. We’ve all had those days or weeks (or months or years) where we’ve felt scatterbrained — out of control of our own reality, constantly sucked down rabbit holes of pointless information and drama comprised of endless clicks and notifications.”

Smartphones are the New Cigarettes
https://markmanson.net/smartphones
via Instapaper


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