tag:digitalethics.net,2013:/posts Digital Ethics by FuturistGerd 2018-04-12T16:46:28Z Digital Ethics by Futurist Gerd Leonhard tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1271863 2018-04-12T16:46:27Z 2018-04-12T16:46:28Z Congress Is Unearthing Facebook’s Terrible Power
“The problem Zuckerberg faces is running an empire that’s too big for any one entity to control. The largest virtual public square in the world, one that provides a communications tool to 2.2 billion users is overseen by one individual. Zuckerberg created something that is far bigger than himself, and he–along with the rest of us–failed to account for the unintended consequences in advance. We’re concerned about who gets access to our information, yes. But as yesterday’s Senate hearing revealed, we’re also concerned about many other ways Facebook is impacting our lives. We’re worried our children are becoming addicted to it.”

Congress Is Unearthing Facebook’s Terrible Power
https://www.wired.com/story/congress-is-unearthing-facebooks-terrible-power/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1269224 2018-04-05T16:26:18Z 2018-04-05T16:26:19Z What Will Our Society Look Like When Artificial Intelligence Is Everywhere? The view from 2065
“Humans look back at the beginning of the 21st century the way people then looked back at the 18th century: a time of sickness and disaster, where children and loved ones were swept away by diseases. Cholera, lung cancer and river blindness no longer threaten us. By 2065, humans are on the verge of freeing themselves People like Ray Kurzweil, the inventor and author of The Singularity Is Near, are entranced with the idea of living forever. It’s something I’ve always found depressing, but I wouldn’t mind having several lives packed into one. And that seems reachable. “AI won’t lead to immortality, because there will always be accidents,” says Susan Schneider, “but it will lead to extreme life extension.” Of course living longer will be cool only if the world is actually not a hellscape—and if you live in one of the nice parts. “I think [curing diseases] would be wonderful,” she says, “especially if we had cheap energy and were able to end world resource scarcity. I imagine some societies will come closer to achieving that than others.” from the biology that created them.”

What Will Our Society Look Like When Artificial Intelligence Is Everywhere?
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/artificial-intelligence-future-scenarios-180968403/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1269204 2018-04-05T15:18:38Z 2018-04-05T15:18:39Z How the Government Could Fix Facebook
“Peter Swire, a privacy-law professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology who testified last year in an Irish court on behalf of Facebook, recently laid out the legal case for why Google and Facebook might be regulated as public utilities. Both companies, he argued, satisfy the traditional criteria for utility regulation: They have large market share, are natural monopolies, and are difficult for customers to do without.”

How the Government Could Fix Facebook
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/04/four-ways-to-fix-facebook/557255/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1268363 2018-04-03T07:06:45Z 2018-04-03T07:06:46Z The Paradox of Universal Basic Income: must-read by Joi Ito
“That would be applauded by libertarians and some conservatives, but not by many others.

Underpinning the Silicon Valley argument for UBI is the belief in exponential growth powered by science and technology, as described by Peter Diamandis in his book Abundance: The Future is Better Than You Think. Diamandis contends that technological progress, including gains in health, the power of computing, and the development of machine intelligence, among other things, will lead to a kind of technological transcendence that makes today’s society look like how we view the Dark Ages. He argues that the human mind is unable to intuitively grasp this idea, and so we constantly underestimate long-term effects. If you plot progress out a few decades, Diamandis writes, we end up with unimaginable abundance: “We will soon have the ability to meet and exceed the basic needs of every man, woman, and child on the planet. Abundance for all is within our grasp.” (Technologists often forget is that we actually already have enough food to feed the world; the problem is that it’s just not properly distributed.)

Many tech billionaires think they can have their cake and eat it too, that they are so rich and smart the trickle-down theory can lift the poor out of poverty without anyone or anything suffering. And why shouldn’t they think so? Their companies and their wealth have grown exponentially, and it doesn’t appear as though there is any end in sight, as Marc Andreessen prophetically predicted in his famous essay, “Why Software is Eating the World.” Most of Silicon Valley’s leaders gained their wealth in an exponentially growing market without having to engage in the aggressive tactics that marked the creation of wealth in the past. They feel their businesses inherently “do good,” and that, I believe, allows them to feel more charitable, broadly speaking.”

The Paradox of Universal Basic Income
https://www.wired.com/story/the-paradox-of-universal-basic-income/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1267701 2018-04-01T15:08:37Z 2018-04-01T15:08:38Z Facebook Executive In 2016: “Maybe Someone Dies In A Terrorist Attack Coordinated On Our Tools”
“The ugly truth is that we believe in connecting people so deeply that anything that allows us to connect more people more often is *de facto* good. It is perhaps the only area where the metrics do tell the true story as far as we are concerned,” he wrote. “That isn’t something we are doing for ourselves. Or for our stock price (ha!). It is literally just what we do. We connect people. Period.””

Facebook Executive In 2016: “Maybe Someone Dies In A Terrorist Attack Coordinated On Our Tools”
https://www.buzzfeed.com/ryanmac/growth-at-any-cost-top-facebook-executive-defended-data
via Instapaper



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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1267700 2018-04-01T15:08:27Z 2018-04-01T15:08:30Z Are you ready? This is all the data Facebook and Google have on you | Dylan Curran
“This is one of the craziest things about the modern age. We would never let the government or a corporation put cameras/microphones in our homes or location trackers on us. But we just went ahead and did it ourselves because – to hell with it! – I want to”

Are you ready? This is all the data Facebook and Google have on you | Dylan Curran
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/mar/28/all-the-data-facebook-google-has-on-you-privacy
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1267614 2018-04-01T10:36:14Z 2018-04-01T10:36:14Z Emmanuel Macron Talks to WIRED About France's AI Strategy
“EM: I think artificial intelligence will disrupt all the different business models and it’s the next disruption to come. So I want to be part of it. Otherwise I will just be subjected to this disruption without creating jobs in this country. So that’s where we are. And there is a huge acceleration and as always the winner takes all in this field. So that’s why my first objective in terms of education, training, research, and the creation of startups is to streamline a lot of things, to have the adaptable systems, the adapted financing, the adapted regulations, in order to build champions here and to attract the existing champions.

Laura Stevens”

Emmanuel Macron Talks to WIRED About France's AI Strategy
https://www.wired.com/story/emmanuel-macron-talks-to-wired-about-frances-ai-strategy/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1266071 2018-03-28T10:36:17Z 2018-03-28T10:36:18Z Mark Zuckerberg Thinks We’re Idiots. Via Monday Note
“As Facebook’s leader, Zuckerberg resolves to get things straightened out in the future (“it’s my job, right?”) while he delivers a callcenter-style broken record reassurance: “Your privacy is important to us”. Yes, of course, our privacy is important to you; you made billions by surveilling and mining our private lives. One wonders how aware Zuckerberg is of the double entendre.”

Mark Zuckerberg Thinks We’re Idiots. – Monday Note
https://mondaynote.com/mark-zuckerberg-thinks-were-idiots-638c64dfab12
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1264469 2018-03-23T15:13:56Z 2018-03-24T12:56:52Z The Tyranny of Convenience - made me think
“In the developed nations of the 21st century, convenience — that is, more efficient and easier ways of doing personal tasks — has emerged as perhaps the most powerful force shaping our individual lives and our economies. This is particularly true in America, where, despite all the paeans to freedom and individuality, one sometimes wonders whether convenience is in fact the supreme value.

As Evan Williams, a co-founder of Twitter, recently put it, “Convenience decides everything.” Convenience seems to make our decisions for us, trumping what we like to imagine are our true preferences. (I prefer to brew my coffee, but Starbucks instant is so convenient I hardly ever do what I “prefer.”) Easy is better, easiest is best.”

Opinion | The Tyranny of Convenience
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/16/opinion/sunday/tyranny-convenience.html
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1263584 2018-03-20T18:52:02Z 2018-03-21T00:25:18Z Opinion | Facebook’s Surveillance Machine
“Mr. Grewal is right: This wasn’t a breach in the technical sense. It is something even more troubling: an all-too-natural consequence of Facebook’s business model, which involves having people go to the site for social interaction, only to be quietly subjected to an enormous level of surveillance. The results of that surveillance are used to fuel a sophisticated and opaque system for narrowly targeting advertisements and other wares to Facebook’s users.”

Opinion | Facebook’s Surveillance Machine
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/19/opinion/facebook-cambridge-analytica.html
via Instapaper


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1263492 2018-03-20T13:53:22Z 2018-03-20T13:53:23Z China's Dystopian Tech Could Be Contagious
“Known by the anodyne name “social credit,” this system is designed to reach into every corner of existence both online and off. It monitors each individual’s consumer behavior, conduct on social networks, and real-world infractions like speeding tickets or quarrels with neighbors. Then it integrates them into a single, algorithmically determined “sincerity” score. Every Chinese citizen receives a literal, numeric index of their trustworthiness and virtue, and this index unlocks, well, everything. In principle, anyway, this one number will determine the opportunities citizens are offered, the freedoms they enjoy, and the privileges they are granted.”

China's Dystopian Tech Could Be Contagious
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/02/chinas-dangerous-dream-of-urban-control/553097/
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1258471 2018-03-08T14:34:07Z 2018-03-08T14:34:07Z From dopamine to serotonin - good post about happiness - by Humberto Schwab
“According to Robert Lustig, there has been a fundamental error or even a system fallacy in the way the Americans understand the “pursuit of happiness.” A philosophical principle that was firmly established by Jefferson.

We can see that happiness has been mixed up with pleasure. People got the toxic message that happiness can be bought, exchanging pleasure for happiness. The fast-food industry explicitly stresses that you can buy ”happiness.” Also on the internet and in the daily language, we see a complete confusion of these fundamentally different concepts.”

From dopamine to serotonin
http://www.socraticdesignacademy.com/2018/01/16/from-dopamine-to-serotonin/
via Instapaper





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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1258455 2018-03-08T13:33:46Z 2018-03-08T13:33:47Z For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned. Made me think!
“Real life is slow; it takes professionals time to figure out what happened, and how it fits into context. Technology is fast. Smartphones and social networks are giving us facts about the news much faster than we can make sense of them, letting speculation and misinformation fill the gap.

It has only gotten worse. As news organizations evolved to a digital landscape dominated by apps and social platforms, they felt more pressure to push news out faster. Now, after something breaks, we’re all buzzed with the alert, often before most of the facts are in. So you’re driven online not just to find out what happened, but really to figure it out.”

For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/technology/two-months-news-newspapers.html
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1256698 2018-03-04T11:21:56Z 2018-03-04T11:21:56Z Forget learning to code, bosses value collaboration and communication - EQ is the future !
“The report found that while automation is requiring workers to maintain technical fluency across roles, the rise of machine-led tasks makes it necessary for them to do what machines can’t, which is to be adaptable, critical thinkers who can lead and communicate well.”

Forget learning to code, bosses value collaboration and communication
https://www.fastcompany.com/40536361/soft-skills-take-the-top-spot-in-employers-ranking-for-developing-talent
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1256650 2018-03-04T07:31:49Z 2018-03-04T07:31:49Z This year’s tech trends prove we need to embrace Responsible AI sooner—not later
“As AI plays a bigger role in systems that affect social outcomes—like criminal justice, education, hiring, or health care—it’s clear that the creation and shape of AI decision-making needs to be taken seriously. What happens when algorithms decide whether or not you get a job, home, or loan?”

This year’s tech trends prove we need to embrace Responsible AI sooner—not later
https://qz.com/1212678/years-tech-trends-prove-we-need-to-embrace-responsible-ai-sooner/
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1251215 2018-02-22T13:10:14Z 2018-02-22T13:10:41Z Tech companies should stop pretending AI won’t destroy jobs (Kei-Fu Lee)


It will soon be obvious that half our tasks can be done better at almost no cost by AI. This will be the fastest transition humankind has experienced, and we’re not ready for it.

China will have at least a 50/50 chance of winning the race, and there are several reasons for that.”

Tech companies should stop pretending AI won’t destroy jobs
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/610298/tech-companies-should-stop-pretending-ai-wont-destroy-jobs/
via Instapaper


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1247954 2018-02-15T12:04:31Z 2018-02-22T13:10:54Z Why Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google Need to Be Disrupted
“Meanwhile, Facebook and Google (now known as Alphabet) are together worth $1.3 trillion. You could merge the world’s top five advertising agencies (WPP, Omnicom, Publicis, IPG, and Dentsu) with five major media companies (Disney, Time Warner, 21st Century Fox, CBS, and Viacom) and still need to add five major communications companies (AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Charter, and Dish) to get only 90 percent of what Google and Facebook are worth together.”

Why Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google Need to Be Disrupted
http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a15895746/bust-big-tech-silicon-valley/
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1243556 2018-02-06T10:12:26Z 2018-02-14T05:11:52Z The Revolt Against Silicon Valley’s Failed Dream – Eudaimonia and Co, Umair Haque
“I’ve warned for a long time that organizations — whether societies or corporations or political parties — must focus, in this troubled, fractured age, on mattering to people: really improving and transforming their lives. The “backlash” tech faces now is what happens when you don’t. More accurately put, people and societies are losing trust in tech, catastrophically. Why is that?”

The Revolt Against Silicon Valley’s Failed Dream – Eudaimonia and Co
https://eand.co/the-revolt-against-silicon-valleys-failed-dream-1bf94546a9e2
via Instapaper



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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1243554 2018-02-06T10:12:15Z 2018-02-14T05:11:52Z There Is One Thing Computers Will Never Beat Us At – NewCo Shift
“In the world of the future, automated perfection is going to be common. Machines will bake perfect cakes, perfectly schedule appointments and keep an eye on your house. What is going to be scarce is human imperfection.”

There Is One Thing Computers Will Never Beat Us At – NewCo Shift
https://shift.newco.co/there-is-one-thing-that-computers-will-never-beat-us-at-f66af30565f0
via Instapaper




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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1243553 2018-02-06T10:11:27Z 2018-02-14T05:11:52Z Why We’re Underestimating American Collapse – Eudaimonia and Co / Umair Haque
“The predator in American society isn’t just its super-rich — but an invisible and insatiable force: the normalization of what in the rest of the world would be seen as shameful, historic, generational moral failures, if not crimes, becoming mere mundane everyday affairs not to be too worried by or troubled about.”

Why We’re Underestimating American Collapse – Eudaimonia and Co
https://eand.co/why-were-underestimating-american-collapse-be04d9e55235
via Instapaper
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1241775 2018-02-02T08:49:35Z 2018-02-14T05:11:52Z Self-driving cars are overdue for a reality check
“If you think you’ll be able to waltz down to your local dealership and plunk down money for a self-driving car, you’ll be disappointed, however. The sensor suite that allows these cars to “see” their environment, combined with the compute hardware eating up a lot of space in the trunk, are really, really expensive. Most automakers are operating under the assumption that autonomous cars won’t be sold as personal vehicles, but instead will be used as part of a service fleet.”

Self-driving cars are overdue for a reality check
https://www.theverge.com/2018/1/30/16950726/state-of-autonomous-car-self-driving-ces-detroit-2018
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1239494 2018-01-29T05:42:11Z 2018-02-14T05:11:52Z Maybe It’s Time To Regulate Gadgets And Apps Like Cigarettes
“On Wednesday Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff said Facebook should be regulated like a tobacco product. “I think that you do it exactly the same way that you regulated the cigarette industry,” Benioff said on CNBC’s Squawk Alley. “Here’s a product: Cigarettes. They’re addictive, they’re not good for you,” Benioff said. For someone of Benioff’s stature and reputation, this is a bombshell.”

Maybe It’s Time To Regulate Gadgets And Apps Like Cigarettes
https://www.fastcompany.com/40520843/silicon-valley-technology-regulate-gadgets-and-apps-like-cigarettes
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1227376 2018-01-06T06:00:56Z 2018-02-14T05:11:52Z Who serves whom? – iA - the bullshit challenge
So very true!

“The debate when machines will be more intelligent than us and whether they can have feelings is fascinating on many levels. And so is the question what kind of people a self-driving machine should kill in an either-or situation. Talking sciencefiction, debating logical paradoxes and ethical trick questions makes for great small talk, promising business plans, lucrative promises, cheap marketing, fantastic hoaxes, fun games, entertaining illustrations catchy headlines, half knowledge, spectacular cock fights, world record bullshit, and great clickbait.”

Who serves whom? – iA
https://ia.net/topics/who-serves-whom/
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1227375 2018-01-06T06:00:49Z 2018-02-14T05:11:52Z Technology extends and also amputates (McLUHAN)
“Technology can be described as an amplifier or an extension of the human body. The hammer is an extension of the fist, the knife is an extension of our teeth, TVs are exaggerated eyes and ears. Marshall McLuhan claimed that every extension results in an auto-amputation of another part.

“Every extension of mankind, especially technological extensions, has the effect of amputating or modifying some other extension[…] The extension of a technology like the automobile ‘amputates’ the need for a highly developed walking culture, which in turn causes cities and countries to develop in different ways. The telephone extends the voice, but also amputates the art of penmanship gained through regular correspondence. These are a few examples, and almost everything we can think of is subject to similar observations…We have become people who regularly praise all extensions, and minimize all amputations.””

Who serves whom? – iA
https://ia.net/topics/who-serves-whom/
via Instapaper


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1217204 2017-12-15T17:12:23Z 2018-02-14T05:11:52Z These Technologies Will Shape The Future, According To One Of Silicon Valley’s Top VC Firms
“Although it’s the furthest from changing the world, Evans touts the broad possible impact of autonomy. When the day comes, he says, that cars, buses, and other vehicles no longer need drivers, it’ll be possible to completely re-imagine what those vehicles can be, and even better, re-imagine the world in which they move.

If you don’t have drivers, you can probably have more cars on the roads. There will be almost no accidents as the vehicles move in tandem, always aware of each other, and that will mean different kinds of roads. That, in turn, can lead to all-new urban design–with no need to provide parking spaces, no congestion, dynamic road pricing, and a totally different dynamic around where people live, shop, eat, drink, and so on.”

These Technologies Will Shape The Future, According To One Of Silicon Valley’s Top VC Firms
https://www.fastcompany.com/40502906/these-technologies-will-shape-the-future-according-to-one-of-silicon-valleys-top-vc-firms
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1217203 2017-12-15T17:11:56Z 2018-02-14T05:11:52Z AI is now so complex its creators can’t trust why it makes decisions
“We don’t want to accept arbitrary decisions by entities, people or AIs, that we don’t understand,” said Uber AI researcher Jason Yosinkski, co-organizer of the Interpretable AI workshop. “In order for machine learning models to be accepted by society, we’re going to need to know why they’re making the decisions they’re making.””

AI is now so complex its creators can’t trust why it makes decisions
https://qz.com/1146753/ai-is-now-so-complex-its-creators-cant-trust-why-it-makes-decisions/
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1211255 2017-12-04T15:29:47Z 2018-02-14T05:11:51Z The real risk of automation: boredom
“As we learn to exert ourselves, we seem able to make more habitual applications of effort over time. Effort plays a critical role in human performance; students show better learning outcomes when their work is effortful. Effort is associated with improved wellbeing, demonstrating positive associations with enhanced goal-directed behaviour: we get better at doing what we aim to do, rather than be side-tracked by distraction or temptation.

As we automate more and more number of human tasks, we should consider the value of what we are eliminating. What happens if we miss out on positive experiences associated with effort? Will we lose the ‘effort’ habit in the process, with deleterious effects further down the line?”

The real risk of automation: boredom
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/11/automation-automated-job-risk-robot-bored-boredom-effort-fourth-industrial-revolution/
via Instapaper


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1211220 2017-12-04T14:17:27Z 2018-02-02T13:09:53Z The real risk of automation: boredom
“Much low-income, manual work will still require human workers. It will take time to roboticize these roles entirely. For example, automated vehicles will deliver goods to local hubs. But it will be some years until an army of cheap robots is smart enough to navigate the ‘final mile’ through unpredictable entrances, up stairways and into small, rusty letterboxes.”

The real risk of automation: boredom
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/11/automation-automated-job-risk-robot-bored-boredom-effort-fourth-industrial-revolution/
via Instapaper




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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1211111 2017-12-04T08:22:23Z 2018-02-02T13:09:54Z Mastering the Learning Pyramid - John Hagel
“Skills are about “knowing how.” Knowledge – the second level of the learning pyramid - is about “knowing what.” Our schools tend to focus on broad-based knowledge like history, economics and science that give us a context for understanding the world we live in, but the knowledge here tends to be reduced to facts and figures that can be recited on a test – it truly is about “knowing what” rather than “knowing why.””

Mastering the Learning Pyramid
http://edgeperspectives.typepad.com/edge_perspectives/2017/11/mastering-the-learning-pyramid.html
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1207340 2017-11-23T20:23:30Z 2018-02-02T13:09:53Z A state Supreme Court justice’s open letter to AI
“We’re in for more than just a world of change and evolution. We’re in for some discussion of what it means to be human. At its most ambitious, AI’s promise is to serve as a framework for improving human welfare to make the world more educated, more interesting and full of possibility, more meaningful, and more safe. But once we overcome some technical problems that are more likely than not to get easier to deal with every day, we’re in for more than just a world of change and evolution. We’re in for some discussion of what it means to be human. And we will soon confront big questions that will drive the well-being of our kids and their kids.”

A state Supreme Court justice’s open letter to AI
https://qz.com/1132418/california-supreme-court-justice-mariano-florentino-cuellars-open-letter-to-ai/
via Instapaper





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