tag:digitalethics.net,2013:/posts Digital Ethics by FuturistGerd 2018-08-06T06:57:40Z Digital Ethics by Futurist Gerd Leonhard tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1309532 2018-08-06T06:57:40Z 2018-08-06T06:57:40Z Why liberal arts and the humanities are as important as engineering - Vivek Wadhwa
“With the convergence of medicine, artificial intelligence and sensors, we can create digital doctors that monitor our health and help us prevent disease; with the advances in genomics and gene editing, we have the ability to create plants that are drought resistant and that feed the planet; with robots powered by artificial intelligence, we can build digital companions for the elderly. Nanomaterial advances are enabling a new generation of solar and storage technologies that will make energy affordable and available to all.

Creating solutions such as these requires a knowledge of fields such as biology, education, health sciences and human behavior. Tackling today’s biggest social and technological challenges requires the ability to think critically about their human context, which is something that humanities graduates happen to be best trained to do.

An engineering degree is very valuable, but the sense of empathy that comes from music, arts, literature and psychology provides a big advantage in design. A history major who has studied the Enlightenment or the rise and fall of the Roman Empire gains an insight into the human elements of technology and the importance of its usability.”

Why liberal arts and the humanities are as important as engineering - Vivek Wadhwa
http://wadhwa.com/2018/06/12/liberal-arts-humanities-important-engineering/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1309528 2018-08-06T06:43:33Z 2018-08-06T06:43:34Z Why liberal arts and the humanities are as important as engineering - Vivek Wadhwa
“Steve Jobs touted the importance of liberal arts and humanities at the unveiling of the iPad 2: “It’s in Apple’s DNA that technology alone is not enough — it’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the result that makes our heart sing, and nowhere is that more true than in these post-PC devices.” With this focus, he built the most valuable company in the world and set new standards for the technology industry.

Logitech CEO Bracken Darrell, who majored in English, also emphasized this. I recently asked him how he turned his company around and caused its stock price to increase by an astonishing 450 percent over five years. He said that it was through relentlessly focusing on design in every product the company built; that engineering is important but what makes a technology product most successful is its design.

The key to good design is a combination of empathy and knowledge of the arts and humanities. Musicians and artists inherently have the greatest sense of creativity. You can teach artists how to use software and graphics tools; turning engineers into artists is hard.”

Why liberal arts and the humanities are as important as engineering - Vivek Wadhwa
http://wadhwa.com/2018/06/12/liberal-arts-humanities-important-engineering/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1306247 2018-07-25T13:58:40Z 2018-07-25T13:58:41Z Man vs. Machine: The New Ethics of Cybersecurity
“Leonhard’s proposed manifesto focuses on five specific human rights that he believes could be endangered if we don’t have an ethical framework by which to guide us. These are:

1. The right to remain natural ,i.e., biological. This means we can be employed, use public services, buy things and function in society without a requirement to deploy technology on or inside our bodies.

2. The right to be inefficient if and where it defines our basic humanities. We must be able to make the choice to be slower than technology and not make efficiency more important than humanity.

3. The right to disconnect. We must retain the right to switch off connectivity, go dark on the network and pause communications, tracking and monitoring.

4. The right to be anonymous. We must retain the option of not being identified and tracked, such as when using a digital application or platform when it doesn’t pose a risk or impose itself on others.

5. The right to employ or involve people instead of machines. We should not allow companies or employers to be disadvantaged if they choose to use people instead of machines—even if it’s more expensive and less efficient.”

Man vs. Machine: The New Ethics of Cybersecurity
https://www.securityroundtable.org/new-ethics-of-cybersecurity/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1303063 2018-07-14T09:39:07Z 2018-07-14T09:39:08Z Review of Technology vs Humanity: The coming clash between man and machine - Ron Immink -
“As Peter Diamandis’ 6Ds, he identified a number of effects.

Dependency – Leaving our thinking to software and algorithms because it’s just so much more convenient and fast.
Confusion – Not knowing if it was the intended human who replied to my emails, or her AI assistant. Or even not knowing if I made my own decision or if I was manipulated by my IDA.
Loss of control – Not having a way of knowing if the AI’s anticipation was correct or not, as we could not possibly track the system’s logic or even comprehend the workings of a quantum computing-fueled, machine-learning system. In other words, we would need to either trust it completely or not at all, similar to the dilemma that some airplane pilots are already facing with their autopilot systems.
Abdication – Being tempted to leave more tasks to systems that would handle them for us, whether it is coordinating personal schedules, making appointments, or answering simple emails. Then, of course, it would be very likely that we would simply blame the cloud/bot/AI if something went wrong.
Reminds me of the “The Seventh Sense“. Do you think AI will let us when it has taken over?”

Technology vs Humanity: The coming clash between man and machine - Ron Immink - Bestselling author, speaker, entrepreneur and ecopreneur.
https://www.ronimmink.com/technology-vs-humanity-coming-clash-man-machine/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1303051 2018-07-14T08:41:08Z 2018-07-14T08:41:08Z ‘Find Your Passion’ vs growth mindset
“Dweck, one of the paper’s authors, has previously studied different types of mind-sets as they relate to intelligence. People who have a growth mind-set about their own intelligence tend to be less afraid of failure, according to her research, because they believe smarts are cultivated, not inherent. Interests are related to, but distinct from, abilities, the study authors told me: You can be interested in something but not very good at it. “I’ve been playing guitar for 25 years, but I can’t say that my abilities have gotten that much better in the past 10 years,” O’Keefe said.

Dweck told me that “find your passion” has a laudable history. “Before that, people were saying, ‘Find your genius,’ and that was so intimidating. It implied that only people who were really brilliant at something could succeed,” she said. “‘Find your passion’ felt more democratic. Everybody can have an interest.” But this study suggests that even the idea of finding your “true” interest can intimidate people and keep them from digging further into a field.”

‘Find Your Passion’ Is Awful Advice
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/07/find-your-passion-is-terrible-advice/564932/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1301821 2018-07-10T17:54:39Z 2018-07-10T17:54:40Z Let’s make private data into a public good
“The so-called sharing economy is based on the same idea. Instead of interacting with some kind of institution (like a travel agency), customers interact with each other. The role of a company, then, is not to provide the service but to connect sellers (like someone who owns a car and is willing to drive it) with buyers (someone who needs a ride). These so-called platforms are presented as a radical transformation in the way goods and services are produced, shared, and delivered. But they’re also an easy way for companies to avoid responsibility. When disabled users complain to Uber that their drivers refuse to put wheelchairs in the trunk, Uber says, well, we’re not a taxi company, we’re just a platform. Airbnb is similarly reluctant to take responsibility for the safety of the premises offered on its site, or for racial discrimination against renters by property owners. After all, Airbnb didn’t build the apartments and doesn’t own them—it’s just a platform.”

Let’s make private data into a public good
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/611489/lets-make-private-data-into-a-public-good/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1300417 2018-07-06T14:10:08Z 2018-07-06T14:10:09Z Google is Reportedly Looking to Take Over Call Centers With Its Duplex AI Assistant
“If Google can find its way into the business of automated phone calls for companies, it could creep its way into a massive profit center. The research firm ResearchAndMarkets projects the cloud-based customer call center market will reach about $21 billion by 2022—up from $6.8 billion in 2017.

Of course, as the market expands, so will the competition, and Google isn’t the only major tech firm that sees opportunity in entering call centers. Last year, Amazon started selling a version of its wildly popular voice assistant Alexa designed specifically for use responding to questions via phone and text. Companies like IBM, Microsoft, and Cisco also already have their foot in the door of this business, per The Information.

While there may be major profits awaiting these firms as the conquer call centers, they also come with a cost: humans will inevitably be bumped from the jobs. Most companies already outsource the work to countries where they can pay paltry wages in order to keep the expenses related to customer service down, and AI would likely cut those costs even more. That would be devastating for a nation like the Philippines, which has an estimated 1.2 million call-center workers according to the Wall Street Journal.”

Google is Reportedly Looking to Take Over Call Centers With Its Duplex AI Assistant
https://gizmodo.com/google-is-reportedly-looking-to-take-over-call-centers-1827379911
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1296717 2018-06-24T17:26:19Z 2018-06-24T17:26:20Z 41 highlights from Homo Deus by Yuval Harari: “Science is converging on an all-encompassing dogma, which says that organisms are algorithms and life is data processing.”
“For 300 years the world has been dominated by humanism, which sanctifies the life, happiness and power of Homo sapiens. The attempt to gain immortality, bliss and divinity merely takes the long-standing humanist ideals to their logical conclusion.

You want to know how super-intelligent cyborgs might treat ordinary flesh-and-blood humans? Better start by investigating how humans treat their less intelligent animal cousins. It’s not a perfect analogy, of course, but it is the best archetype we can actually observe rather than just imagine.”

41 highlights from Homo Deus by Yuval Harari: “Science is converging on an all-encompassing dogma, which says that organisms are algorithms and life is data processing.”
http://www.kevinhabits.com/41-highlights-from-homo-deus-by-yuval-harari-science-is-converging-on-an-all-encompassing-dogma-which-says-that-organisms-are-algorithms-and-life-is-data-processing/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1295516 2018-06-19T14:30:43Z 2018-06-19T14:30:43Z It’s time to rein in the data barons
“Jonathan Taplin, the director emeritus of the Annenberg Innovation Lab at the University of Southern California, argues in Move Fast and Break Things, his book about the power of the internet giants, that rebel artists have long had to deal with “suits” who control distribution of their work. But the rise of companies like Facebook and Amazon has increased the stakes immeasurably. “The concentration of profits in the making of arts and news,” he writes, “has made more than just artists and journalists vulnerable: it has made all those who seek to profit from the free exchange of ideas and culture vulnerable to the power of a small group of …”

It’s time to rein in the data barons
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/611425/its-time-to-rein-in-the-data-barons/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1285481 2018-05-20T07:29:39Z 2018-05-20T07:29:40Z Steven Pinker’s Ideas About Progress Are Fatally Flawed. These Eight Graphs Show Why.
“Taken together, these graphs illustrate ecological overshoot: the fact that, in the pursuit of material progress, our civilization is consuming the earth’s resources faster than they can be replenished. Overshoot is particularly dangerous because of its relatively slow feedback loops: if your checking account balance approaches zero, you know that if you keep writing checks they will bounce. In overshoot, however, it’s as though our civilization keeps taking out bigger and bigger overdrafts to replenish the account, and then we pretend these funds are income and celebrate our continuing “progress.” In the end, of course, the money runs dry and it’s game over.”

Steven Pinker’s Ideas About Progress Are Fatally Flawed. These Eight Graphs Show Why.
https://patternsofmeaning.com/2018/05/17/steven-pinkers-ideas-about-progress-are-fatally-flawed-these-eight-graphs-show-why/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1285266 2018-05-19T16:44:00Z 2018-05-19T16:44:02Z Google’s Selfish Ledger is an unsettling vision of Silicon Valley social engineering - watch the video !!
“Building on the ledger idea, the middle section of the video presents a conceptual Resolutions by Google system, in which Google prompts users to select a life goal and then guides them toward it in every interaction they have with their phone. The examples, which would “reflect Google’s values as an organization,” include urging you to try a more environmentally friendly option when hailing an Uber or directing you to buy locally grown produce from Safeway.”

Google’s Selfish Ledger is an unsettling vision of Silicon Valley social engineering
https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/17/17344250/google-x-selfish-ledger-video-data-privacy
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1282784 2018-05-12T12:52:09Z 2018-05-12T12:52:10Z Jaron Lanier Q&A: ‘We Won, and We Turned Into Assholes’
“And then when you move out of the tech world, everybody’s struggling. It’s a very strange thing. The numbers show an economy that’s doing well, but the reality is that the way it’s doing well doesn’t give many people a feeling of security or confidence in their futures. It’s like everybody’s working for Uber in one way or another. Everything’s become the gig economy. And we routed it that way, that’s our doing. There’s this strange feeling when you just look outside of the tight circle of Silicon Valley, almost like entering another country, where people are less secure. It’s not a good feeling. I don’t think it’s worth it, I think we’re wrong to want that feeling.”

Jaron Lanier Q&A: ‘We Won, and We Turned Into Assholes’
http://nymag.com/selectall/2018/04/jaron-lanier-interview-on-what-went-wrong-with-the-internet.html
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1282490 2018-05-11T16:15:21Z 2018-05-11T16:15:22Z Google goes for the wow at I/O, but what about privacy? - CNET
“We tell Facebook all about ourselves, but Google knows the real us," says Brian Solis, an analyst at the Altimeter Group. "That's why it's so incredible -- and also so dangerous at the same time."”

Google goes for the wow at I/O, but what about privacy? - CNET
https://www.cnet.com/news/google-goes-for-the-wow-at-io-2018-but-what-about-privacy-ai-virtual-assistant/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1282488 2018-05-11T16:15:18Z 2018-05-11T16:15:18Z Bill Gates: Global inequality is falling faster than ever
“Now let’s move on to the global picture, and look at the share of global wealth held by the richest 1% - a slightly different measure than the earlier chart, which looked at income inequality. A January 2016 Oxfam report revealed that the richest 1% held over 50% of global wealth – a situation that has become steadily worse over the last five years:


Image: Oxfam

But Bill Gates’ point – which he has made before – is that while incomes at the top of the scale may be rising, overall global inequality is being reduced by the reduction of poverty.

While he is specifically referring to the last 20 years or so, the wider point can be illustrated by taking a longer view. This graphic from Our World in Data shows the progress made in improving the distribution of world income over the last 200 years.”

Bill Gates: Global inequality is falling faster than ever
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/04/bill-gates-global-inequality-is-falling-faster-than-ever/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1282044 2018-05-10T12:23:27Z 2018-05-10T12:23:28Z The Neighbourhood Where Google Plans to Kill the Private Car
“Many of us may someday be living inside that structure. And what brings us there could be Quayside’s self-driving cars. “Power and control over autonomous-vehicle technology is already concentrated in the hands of a small few,” wrote Anna Wiener last November in the New York Times, “If a company like Uber or Alphabet controls the dominant transportation infrastructure you need not live in an intentional community like Quayside to feel as though your city is becoming a company town.””

The Neighbourhood Where Google Plans to Kill the Private Car
https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/a3y59e/the-neighbourhood-where-google-plans-to-kill-the-private-car
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1282006 2018-05-10T09:22:21Z 2018-05-10T09:22:22Z The Neighbourhood Where Google Plans to Kill the Private Car
“If Google can hasten the demise of the private car, it would accelerate a shift in corporate power already underway at the top of our economy. Since the advent of car-dependant suburbs like Levittown, the world’s most valuable companies have been oil producers like Exxon, Shell, BP, and Chevron. Today the list is dominated by Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook. Google’s parent Alphabet alone is worth $763 billion. “The numbers are staggering,” Gerd Leonhard, a Switzerland-based futurist, speaker and author, recently told me. “Tech is basically much bigger and more powerful than oil has ever been.” Google’s vast financial power comes from ruling the digital realm. Quayside gives it a bridge into our physical world.”

The Neighbourhood Where Google Plans to Kill the Private Car
https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/a3y59e/the-neighbourhood-where-google-plans-to-kill-the-private-car
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1279882 2018-05-03T06:56:23Z 2018-05-03T06:56:23Z Life in 2030: these are the 4 things experts can't predict
“This explosion of connectivity brings new possibilities, but also economic and social vulnerabilities. The level of coordination and coding required to stitch the Internet of Things together is orders of magnitude more complicated than any historical endeavour yet. It is likely that things will break and no one will know how to fix them. Bad actors will be able to achieve societal disruptions at scale and from afar. Consequently, we are faced with some hard, costly choices. How much redundancy should these complex systems have? How will they be defended and by whom? How is liability redefined, as objects are networked across a global grid and attacks can metastasize quickly?”

Life in 2030: these are the 4 things experts can't predict
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/11/life-in-2030-what-experts-cant-predict/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1271863 2018-04-12T16:46:27Z 2018-04-12T16:46:28Z Congress Is Unearthing Facebook’s Terrible Power
“The problem Zuckerberg faces is running an empire that’s too big for any one entity to control. The largest virtual public square in the world, one that provides a communications tool to 2.2 billion users is overseen by one individual. Zuckerberg created something that is far bigger than himself, and he–along with the rest of us–failed to account for the unintended consequences in advance. We’re concerned about who gets access to our information, yes. But as yesterday’s Senate hearing revealed, we’re also concerned about many other ways Facebook is impacting our lives. We’re worried our children are becoming addicted to it.”

Congress Is Unearthing Facebook’s Terrible Power
https://www.wired.com/story/congress-is-unearthing-facebooks-terrible-power/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1269224 2018-04-05T16:26:18Z 2018-04-05T16:26:19Z What Will Our Society Look Like When Artificial Intelligence Is Everywhere? The view from 2065
“Humans look back at the beginning of the 21st century the way people then looked back at the 18th century: a time of sickness and disaster, where children and loved ones were swept away by diseases. Cholera, lung cancer and river blindness no longer threaten us. By 2065, humans are on the verge of freeing themselves People like Ray Kurzweil, the inventor and author of The Singularity Is Near, are entranced with the idea of living forever. It’s something I’ve always found depressing, but I wouldn’t mind having several lives packed into one. And that seems reachable. “AI won’t lead to immortality, because there will always be accidents,” says Susan Schneider, “but it will lead to extreme life extension.” Of course living longer will be cool only if the world is actually not a hellscape—and if you live in one of the nice parts. “I think [curing diseases] would be wonderful,” she says, “especially if we had cheap energy and were able to end world resource scarcity. I imagine some societies will come closer to achieving that than others.” from the biology that created them.”

What Will Our Society Look Like When Artificial Intelligence Is Everywhere?
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/artificial-intelligence-future-scenarios-180968403/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1269204 2018-04-05T15:18:38Z 2018-04-05T15:18:39Z How the Government Could Fix Facebook
“Peter Swire, a privacy-law professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology who testified last year in an Irish court on behalf of Facebook, recently laid out the legal case for why Google and Facebook might be regulated as public utilities. Both companies, he argued, satisfy the traditional criteria for utility regulation: They have large market share, are natural monopolies, and are difficult for customers to do without.”

How the Government Could Fix Facebook
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/04/four-ways-to-fix-facebook/557255/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1268363 2018-04-03T07:06:45Z 2018-04-03T07:06:46Z The Paradox of Universal Basic Income: must-read by Joi Ito
“That would be applauded by libertarians and some conservatives, but not by many others.

Underpinning the Silicon Valley argument for UBI is the belief in exponential growth powered by science and technology, as described by Peter Diamandis in his book Abundance: The Future is Better Than You Think. Diamandis contends that technological progress, including gains in health, the power of computing, and the development of machine intelligence, among other things, will lead to a kind of technological transcendence that makes today’s society look like how we view the Dark Ages. He argues that the human mind is unable to intuitively grasp this idea, and so we constantly underestimate long-term effects. If you plot progress out a few decades, Diamandis writes, we end up with unimaginable abundance: “We will soon have the ability to meet and exceed the basic needs of every man, woman, and child on the planet. Abundance for all is within our grasp.” (Technologists often forget is that we actually already have enough food to feed the world; the problem is that it’s just not properly distributed.)

Many tech billionaires think they can have their cake and eat it too, that they are so rich and smart the trickle-down theory can lift the poor out of poverty without anyone or anything suffering. And why shouldn’t they think so? Their companies and their wealth have grown exponentially, and it doesn’t appear as though there is any end in sight, as Marc Andreessen prophetically predicted in his famous essay, “Why Software is Eating the World.” Most of Silicon Valley’s leaders gained their wealth in an exponentially growing market without having to engage in the aggressive tactics that marked the creation of wealth in the past. They feel their businesses inherently “do good,” and that, I believe, allows them to feel more charitable, broadly speaking.”

The Paradox of Universal Basic Income
https://www.wired.com/story/the-paradox-of-universal-basic-income/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1267701 2018-04-01T15:08:37Z 2018-04-01T15:08:38Z Facebook Executive In 2016: “Maybe Someone Dies In A Terrorist Attack Coordinated On Our Tools”
“The ugly truth is that we believe in connecting people so deeply that anything that allows us to connect more people more often is *de facto* good. It is perhaps the only area where the metrics do tell the true story as far as we are concerned,” he wrote. “That isn’t something we are doing for ourselves. Or for our stock price (ha!). It is literally just what we do. We connect people. Period.””

Facebook Executive In 2016: “Maybe Someone Dies In A Terrorist Attack Coordinated On Our Tools”
https://www.buzzfeed.com/ryanmac/growth-at-any-cost-top-facebook-executive-defended-data
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1267700 2018-04-01T15:08:27Z 2018-04-01T15:08:30Z Are you ready? This is all the data Facebook and Google have on you | Dylan Curran
“This is one of the craziest things about the modern age. We would never let the government or a corporation put cameras/microphones in our homes or location trackers on us. But we just went ahead and did it ourselves because – to hell with it! – I want to”

Are you ready? This is all the data Facebook and Google have on you | Dylan Curran
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/mar/28/all-the-data-facebook-google-has-on-you-privacy
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1267614 2018-04-01T10:36:14Z 2018-04-01T10:36:14Z Emmanuel Macron Talks to WIRED About France's AI Strategy
“EM: I think artificial intelligence will disrupt all the different business models and it’s the next disruption to come. So I want to be part of it. Otherwise I will just be subjected to this disruption without creating jobs in this country. So that’s where we are. And there is a huge acceleration and as always the winner takes all in this field. So that’s why my first objective in terms of education, training, research, and the creation of startups is to streamline a lot of things, to have the adaptable systems, the adapted financing, the adapted regulations, in order to build champions here and to attract the existing champions.

Laura Stevens”

Emmanuel Macron Talks to WIRED About France's AI Strategy
https://www.wired.com/story/emmanuel-macron-talks-to-wired-about-frances-ai-strategy/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1266071 2018-03-28T10:36:17Z 2018-03-28T10:36:18Z Mark Zuckerberg Thinks We’re Idiots. Via Monday Note
“As Facebook’s leader, Zuckerberg resolves to get things straightened out in the future (“it’s my job, right?”) while he delivers a callcenter-style broken record reassurance: “Your privacy is important to us”. Yes, of course, our privacy is important to you; you made billions by surveilling and mining our private lives. One wonders how aware Zuckerberg is of the double entendre.”

Mark Zuckerberg Thinks We’re Idiots. – Monday Note
https://mondaynote.com/mark-zuckerberg-thinks-were-idiots-638c64dfab12
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1264469 2018-03-23T15:13:56Z 2018-03-24T12:56:52Z The Tyranny of Convenience - made me think
“In the developed nations of the 21st century, convenience — that is, more efficient and easier ways of doing personal tasks — has emerged as perhaps the most powerful force shaping our individual lives and our economies. This is particularly true in America, where, despite all the paeans to freedom and individuality, one sometimes wonders whether convenience is in fact the supreme value.

As Evan Williams, a co-founder of Twitter, recently put it, “Convenience decides everything.” Convenience seems to make our decisions for us, trumping what we like to imagine are our true preferences. (I prefer to brew my coffee, but Starbucks instant is so convenient I hardly ever do what I “prefer.”) Easy is better, easiest is best.”

Opinion | The Tyranny of Convenience
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/16/opinion/sunday/tyranny-convenience.html
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1263584 2018-03-20T18:52:02Z 2018-03-21T00:25:18Z Opinion | Facebook’s Surveillance Machine
“Mr. Grewal is right: This wasn’t a breach in the technical sense. It is something even more troubling: an all-too-natural consequence of Facebook’s business model, which involves having people go to the site for social interaction, only to be quietly subjected to an enormous level of surveillance. The results of that surveillance are used to fuel a sophisticated and opaque system for narrowly targeting advertisements and other wares to Facebook’s users.”

Opinion | Facebook’s Surveillance Machine
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/19/opinion/facebook-cambridge-analytica.html
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1263492 2018-03-20T13:53:22Z 2018-03-20T13:53:23Z China's Dystopian Tech Could Be Contagious
“Known by the anodyne name “social credit,” this system is designed to reach into every corner of existence both online and off. It monitors each individual’s consumer behavior, conduct on social networks, and real-world infractions like speeding tickets or quarrels with neighbors. Then it integrates them into a single, algorithmically determined “sincerity” score. Every Chinese citizen receives a literal, numeric index of their trustworthiness and virtue, and this index unlocks, well, everything. In principle, anyway, this one number will determine the opportunities citizens are offered, the freedoms they enjoy, and the privileges they are granted.”

China's Dystopian Tech Could Be Contagious
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/02/chinas-dangerous-dream-of-urban-control/553097/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1258471 2018-03-08T14:34:07Z 2018-03-08T14:34:07Z From dopamine to serotonin - good post about happiness - by Humberto Schwab
“According to Robert Lustig, there has been a fundamental error or even a system fallacy in the way the Americans understand the “pursuit of happiness.” A philosophical principle that was firmly established by Jefferson.

We can see that happiness has been mixed up with pleasure. People got the toxic message that happiness can be bought, exchanging pleasure for happiness. The fast-food industry explicitly stresses that you can buy ”happiness.” Also on the internet and in the daily language, we see a complete confusion of these fundamentally different concepts.”

From dopamine to serotonin
http://www.socraticdesignacademy.com/2018/01/16/from-dopamine-to-serotonin/
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1258455 2018-03-08T13:33:46Z 2018-03-08T13:33:47Z For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned. Made me think!
“Real life is slow; it takes professionals time to figure out what happened, and how it fits into context. Technology is fast. Smartphones and social networks are giving us facts about the news much faster than we can make sense of them, letting speculation and misinformation fill the gap.

It has only gotten worse. As news organizations evolved to a digital landscape dominated by apps and social platforms, they felt more pressure to push news out faster. Now, after something breaks, we’re all buzzed with the alert, often before most of the facts are in. So you’re driven online not just to find out what happened, but really to figure it out.”

For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/technology/two-months-news-newspapers.html
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