tag:digitalethics.net,2013:/posts Digital Ethics by FuturistGerd 2017-10-19T18:01:20Z Digital Ethics by Futurist Gerd Leonhard tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1199510 2017-10-19T18:01:19Z 2017-10-19T18:01:20Z AI May Soon Replace Even the Most Elite Consultants (made me think)
“According to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), a new partnership between UBS Wealth Management and Amazon allows some of UBS’s European wealth-management clients to ask Alexa certain financial and economic questions. Alexa will then answer their queries with the information provided by UBS’s chief investment office without even having to pick up the phone or visit a website. And this is likely just Alexa’s first step into offering business services. Soon she will probably be booking appointments, analyzing markets, maybe even buying and selling stocks. While the financial services industry has already begun the shift from active management to passive management, artificial intelligence will move the market even further, to management by smart machines, as in the case of Blackrock, which is rolling computer-driven algorithms and models into more traditional actively-managed funds.

But the financial services industry is just the beginning. Over the next few years, artificial intelligence may exponentially change the way we all gather information, make decisions, and connect with stakeholders. Hopefully this will be for the better and we will all benefit from timely, comprehensive, and bias-free insights (given research that human beings are prone to a variety of cognitive biases). It will be particularly interesting to see how artificial intelligence affects the decisions of corporate leaders — men and women who make the many decisions that affect our everyday lives as customers, employees, partners, and investors.”

AI May Soon Replace Even the Most Elite Consultants
https://hbr.org/2017/07/ai-may-soon-replace-even-the-most-elite-consultants
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1198565 2017-10-16T10:05:57Z 2017-10-17T08:16:07Z Former Talking Heads frontman says consumer tech is working against what it means to be human
It has been about creating the possibility of a world with less human interaction. This tendency is, I suspect, not a bug, it’s a feature. We might think Amazon was about making books available to us that we couldn’t find locally—and it was, and what a brilliant idea—but maybe it was also just as much about eliminating human contact

Former Talking Heads frontman says consumer tech is working against what it means to be human
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/608580/eliminating-the-human/
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1198288 2017-10-14T17:36:06Z 2017-10-14T17:36:07Z Tech Giants, Once Seen as Saviors, Are Now Viewed as Threats (nyt)
In Europe, however, the ground is already shifting. Google’s share of the search engine market there is 92 percent, according to StatCounter. But that did not stop the European Union from fining it $2.7 billion in June for putting its products above those of its rivals.

A new German law that fines social networks huge sums for not taking down hate speech went into effect this month. On Tuesday, a spokesman for Prime Minister Theresa May of Britain said the government was looking carefully at the roles, responsibility and legal status of Google and Facebook, with an eye to regulating them as news publishers rather than platforms.

This war, like so many wars, is going to start in Europe,  said Mr. Galloway, the New York University professor.

Tech Giants, Once Seen as Saviors, Are Now Viewed as Threats
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/10/12/technology/tech-giants-threats.html


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1198190 2017-10-14T02:16:44Z 2017-10-14T02:16:45Z End of the road: will automation put an end to the American trucker - fascinating story
“The only human beings left in the modern supply chain are truck drivers. If you go to a modern warehouse now, say Amazon or Walmart, the trucks are unloaded by machines, the trucks are loaded by machines, they are put into the warehouse by machines. Then there is a guy, probably making $10 an hour, with a load of screens watching these machines. Then what you have is a truckers’ lounge with 20 or 30 guys standing around getting paid. And that drives the supply chain people nuts,” he says.

The goal, he believes, is to get rid of the drivers and “have ultimate efficiency”.

“I think this is imminent. Five years or so. This is a space race – the race to get the first driverless vehicle that is viable,” says Murphy. “My fellow drivers don’t appear to be particularly concerned about this. They think it’s way off into the future. All the people I have talked to on this book tour, nobody thinks this is imminent except for me. Me and Elon Musk, I guess.””

End of the road: will automation put an end to the American trucker?
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/oct/10/american-trucker-automation-jobs
via Instapaper



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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1198045 2017-10-13T13:26:01Z 2017-10-13T13:26:02Z Opportunity for everyone - great post by google CEO Sundar Pinchai
“These are tough gaps. For instance, the nature of work is fundamentally changing. And that is shifting the link between education, training and opportunity. Young people already feel this. An Economist survey found that less than half of 18- to 25-year-olds believe their education gives them the skills they need to enter today’s workforce. That’s a significant gap that’s only going to become more urgent. One-third of jobs in 2020 will require skills that aren’t common today.”

Opportunity for everyone
https://blog.google/topics/causes-community/opportunity-for-everyone/?utm_source=MIT+Technology+Review&utm_campaign=f406b201c7-The_Download&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_997ed6f472-f406b201c7-154803941
via Instapaper



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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1197908 2017-10-12T21:09:15Z 2017-10-12T21:19:47Z From my gig at London Law Expo: being smart is no longer enough (the machines will beat you soon)


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1197734 2017-10-12T06:58:20Z 2017-10-12T06:58:20Z How Russia Harvested American Rage to Reshape U.S. Politics (NYT on “cultural hacking”)
““This is cultural hacking,” said Jonathan Albright, research director at Columbia University’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism. “They are using systems that were already set up by these platforms to increase engagement. They’re feeding outrage — and it’s easy to do, because outrage and emotion is how people share.””

How Russia Harvested American Rage to Reshape U.S. Politics
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/10/09/technology/russia-election-facebook-ads-rage.html?utm_source=nextdraft&utm_medium=email&referer=
via Instapaper


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1197719 2017-10-12T05:59:37Z 2017-10-12T05:59:37Z The Real Problem With Voice Assistants Like Siri Is Your Brain
“The bad news is that the capital-d Dream of a virtual assistant that manages your digital life while you live your real one is probably a lie. The real problem with voice assistants isn't that they're underpowered, or that their neural nets aren't sophisticated enough to intuit our requests. It's that user interfaces will always demand your attention—whether they're graphical, conversational, or, hell, telepathic.

I know this because for the past week, I’ve been using my AirPods to interact with Siri. Not to create timers, launch apps, or add things to my shopping list, but to, you know, get shit done.

In the morning, I slip an AirPod into my ear (just one), double tap it, and ask Siri to read me my emails while I make breakfast, recite the day's schedule while I put away dishes, organize my to-do list while I feed the dog, or help me field and respond to text messages as I pack up my bag and walk to the bus stop. Siri's voice recognition is now strong enough, its neural nets sharp enough, and its access to my personal information complete enough to handle this small handful of tasks quickly and consistently.”

The Real Problem With Voice Assistants Like Siri Is Your Brain
https://www.wired.com/story/multitasking-problem-with-virtual-assistants/
via Instapaper


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1197077 2017-10-09T16:37:40Z 2017-10-09T16:37:41Z 'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia
“There is growing concern that as well as addicting users, technology is contributing toward so-called “continuous partial attention”, severely limiting people’s ability to focus, and possibly lowering IQ. One recent study showed that the mere presence of smartphones damages cognitive capacity – even when the device is turned off. “Everyone is distracted,” Rosenstein says. “All of the time.””

'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/oct/05/smartphone-addiction-silicon-valley-dystopia
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1196633 2017-10-07T14:30:54Z 2017-10-07T14:30:54Z Rise of the Robolawyers: made me think (via TheAtlantic)
“DoNotPay is just the beginning. Until we see a major, society-changing breakthrough in artificial intelligence, robolawyers won’t dispute the finer points of copyright law or write elegant legal briefs. But chatbots could be very useful in certain types of law. Deportation, bankruptcy, and divorce disputes, for instance, typically require navigating lengthy and confusing statutes that have been interpreted in thousands of previous decisions. Chatbots could eventually analyze most every possible exception, loophole, and historical case to determine the best path forward.

As AI develops, robolawyers could help address the vast unmet legal needs of the poor. Roland Vogl, the executive director of the Stanford Program in Law, Science, and Technology, says bots will become the main entry point into the legal system. “Every legal-aid group has to turn people away because there isn’t time to process all of the cases,” he says. “We’ll see cases that get navigated through an artificially intelligent computer system, and lawyers will only get involved when it’s really necessary.” A good analogy is TurboTax: If your taxes are straightforward, you use TurboTax; if they’re not, you get an accountant. The same will happen with law.”

Rise of the Robolawyers
https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/04/rise-of-the-robolawyers/517794/
via Instapaper


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1195755 2017-10-03T19:12:09Z 2017-10-03T19:12:10Z Inside IBM's Vision For AI: Strategic Insights From CEO Ginni Rometty (the end of programming)
“Watson and "The End of Programming": "Everything you know until today is programmable—an entire era for decades has been programmable. Watson would be the beginning of a new era where you didn’t program. Machines would look at data, understand, reason over it, and they continue to learn: understand, reason and learn, not program, in my simple definition."”

Inside IBM's Bold Vision For AI: 7 Strategic Insights From CEO Ginni Rometty
https://www.forbes.com/sites/bobevans1/2017/10/02/inside-ibms-bold-vision-for-ai-7-strategic-insights-from-ceo-ginni-rometty/#3c6dad326548
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1193856 2017-09-25T19:49:03Z 2017-09-25T19:49:03Z How biotechnology will soon give almost anyone the power to destroy humanity
“The results are sobering. If there is a one in 100 chance that somebody with the technology will release it, and there are a few hundred individuals like this, then our civilization is doomed on a timescale of 100 years or so. If there are 100,000 individuals with this technology, then the probability of them releasing it needs to be less than one in 109 for our civilization to last 1,000 years.”

How biotechnology will soon give almost anyone the power to destroy humanity
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/608903/genetic-engineering-holds-the-power-to-save-humanity-or-kill-it/
via Instapaper
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1193855 2017-09-25T19:49:02Z 2017-09-25T19:49:02Z Alibaba founder Jack Ma says to be a successful leader you need EQ, IQ, and LQ
“Ma, a former teacher, says he always warns government leaders to also “pay attention to education,” because right now we’re teaching children the wrong thing: that machines are better than humans. He believes this mindset will cost young people jobs in a future dominated by AI and computing.”

Alibaba founder Jack Ma says to be a successful leader you need EQ, IQ, and LQ
https://qz.com/1082709/alibabas-jack-ma-says-successful-leaders-need-eq-iq-and-lq-baba/
via Instapaper
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1193408 2017-09-24T05:50:19Z 2017-09-24T05:50:20Z I used to think social media was a force for good. Now the evidence says I was wrong | Must-read via Matt Haig
“Kurt Vonnegut said: “We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful who we pretend to be.” This seems especially true now we have reached a new stage of marketing where we are not just consumers, but also the thing consumed. If you have friends you only ever talk to on Facebook, your entire relationship with them is framed by commerce. When we willingly choose to become unpaid content providers, we commercialise ourselves. And we are encouraged to be obsessed with numbers (of followers, messages, comments, retweets, favourites), as if operating in a kind of friend economy, an emotional stock market where the stock is ourselves and where we are encouraged to weigh our worth against others.”

I used to think social media was a force for good. Now the evidence says I was wrong | Matt Haig
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/sep/06/social-media-good-evidence-platforms-insecurities-health
via Instapaper


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1193406 2017-09-24T05:49:36Z 2017-09-24T05:49:36Z I used to think social media was a force for good. Now the evidence says I was wrong | Must-read via Matt Haig
“Kurt Vonnegut said: “We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful who we pretend to be.” This seems especially true now we have reached a new stage of marketing where we are not just consumers, but also the thing consumed. If you have friends you only ever talk to on Facebook, your entire relationship with them is framed by commerce. When we willingly choose to become unpaid content providers, we commercialise ourselves. And we are encouraged to be obsessed with numbers (of followers, messages, comments, retweets, favourites), as if operating in a kind of friend economy, an emotional stock market where the stock is ourselves and where we are encouraged to weigh our worth against others.”

I used to think social media was a force for good. Now the evidence says I was wrong | Matt Haig
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/sep/06/social-media-good-evidence-platforms-insecurities-health
via Instapaper


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1193273 2017-09-23T14:46:34Z 2017-09-23T14:46:34Z Facebook’s war on free will - riveting Guardian story
“But we shouldn’t accept Facebook’s self-conception as sincere, either. Facebook is a carefully managed top-down system, not a robust public square. It mimics some of the patterns of conversation, but that’s a surface trait.

In reality, Facebook is a tangle of rules and procedures for sorting information, rules devised by the corporation for the ultimate benefit of the corporation. Facebook is always surveilling users, always auditing them, using them as lab rats in its behavioural experiments. While it creates the impression that it offers choice, in truth Facebook paternalistically nudges users in the direction it deems best for them, which also happens to be the direction that gets them thoroughly addicted. It’s a phoniness that is most obvious in the compressed, historic career of Facebook’s mastermind.”

Facebook’s war on free will
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/sep/19/facebooks-war-on-free-will
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1192947 2017-09-22T00:11:21Z 2017-09-22T00:11:21Z AI Could Revolutionize War as Much as Nukes
“New technologies like those can be expected to bring with them a series of excruciating moral, political, and diplomatic choices for America and other nations. Building up a new breed of military equipment using artificial intelligence is one thing—deciding what uses of this new power are acceptable is another. The report recommends that the US start considering what uses of AI in war should be restricted using international treaties.

New World Order

The US military has been funding, testing and deploying various shades of machine intelligence for a long time. In 2001, Congress even mandated that one-third of ground combat vehicles should be uncrewed by 2015—a target that has been missed. But the Harvard report argues that recent, rapid progress in artificial intelligence that has invigorated companies such as Google and Amazon is poised to bring an unprecedented surge in military innovation. “Even if all progress in basic AI research and development were to stop, we would still have five or 10 years of applied research,” Allen says.”

AI Could Revolutionize War as Much as Nukes
https://www.wired.com/story/ai-could-revolutionize-war-as-much-as-nukes/
via Instapaper
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1192763 2017-09-21T09:13:42Z 2017-09-21T09:13:42Z Artificial Intelligence Fuels New Global Arms Race - scary Putin quote
“Artificial intelligence is the future, not only for Russia but for all humankind,” he said, via live video beamed to 16,000 selected schools. “Whoever becomes the leader in this sphere will become the ruler of the world.””

Artificial Intelligence Fuels New Global Arms Race
https://www.wired.com/story/for-superpowers-artificial-intelligence-fuels-new-global-arms-race/
via Instapaper



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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1192762 2017-09-21T09:13:34Z 2017-09-21T09:13:34Z IBM Watson CTO on Why Augmented Intelligence Beats AI - good read!
“I think one of the examples that illustrates this really well is in the medical space, where Watson is helping doctors make decisions and parsing large quantities of data, but then ultimately working with them on a diagnosis in partnership. Can you talk a little bit about how that training takes place and then how the solution winds up delivering better outcomes?

The work that we've done in oncology is a good example of where really it's a composition of multiple different kinds of algorithms that, across the spectrum of work that needs to be performed, are used in different ways. We start with, for example, looking at the medical record, looking at your medical record and using the cognitive system to look over all the notes that the clinicians have taken over the years that they've been working with you and finding what we call pertinent clinical information. What is the information in those medical notes that are now relevant to the consultation that you're about to go into? Taking that, doing population similarity analytics, trying to find the other patients, the other cohorts that have a lot of similarity to you, because that's going to inform the doctor on how to think about different treatments and how those treatments might be appropriate for you and how you're going to react to those treatments.

Then we go into what we call the standard of care practices, which are relatively well-defined techniques that doctors share on how they're going to treat different patients for different kinds of diseases, recognizing that those are really designed for the average person. Then we lay on top of that what we call clinical expertise. Having been taught by the best doctors in different diseases what to look for and where the outliers are and how to reason about the different standard of care practices, which of those is most appropriate or how to take the different pathways through those different care practices and now apply them in the best way possible, but finally going in and looking at the clinical literature, all the hundreds of thousands, 600,000 articles in PubMed about the advances in science that have occurred in that field that are relevant to now making this treatment recommendation.”

IBM Watson CTO on Why Augmented Intelligence Beats AI
http://sea.pcmag.com/feature/16986/ibm-watson-cto-on-why-augmented-intelligence-beats-ai
via Instapaper
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1190637 2017-09-12T10:57:09Z 2017-09-12T10:57:09Z Will Democracy Survive Big Data and Artificial Intelligence? Very thoughtful read !
“Some software platforms are moving towards “persuasive computing.” In the future, using sophisticated manipulation technologies, these platforms will be able to steer us through entire courses of action, be it for the execution of complex work processes or to generate free content for Internet platforms, from which corporations earn billions. The trend goes from programming computers to programming people.”

Will Democracy Survive Big Data and Artificial Intelligence?
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/will-democracy-survive-big-data-and-artificial-intelligence/
via Instapaper
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1189408 2017-09-07T10:09:09Z 2017-09-07T10:09:09Z We’re spending so much time trying to become robots that we’re forgetting how to be human (qz.com)
Totally my topic ;)

"The drumbeat of science, technology, engineering, and math has picked up tempo, but a crisis of culture has emerged from its cadence. As we embark ever more aggressively on the path to master machines, we are forgetting the very foundations of what it means to be human.”

We’re spending so much time trying to become robots that we’re forgetting how to be human
https://qz.com/1070296/were-spending-so-much-time-trying-to-become-robots-that-were-forgetting-how-to-be-human/
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1188934 2017-09-05T11:48:48Z 2017-09-05T11:48:48Z The future of computing as predicted by nine science-fiction machines
“Our vision is to create that Star Trek computer and work backwards from that. The Star Trek computer wasn’t limited to just the Enterprise, they could talk to it from their little badges anywhere, so anywhere where you think that instant access to an intelligent assistant is valuable in an ambient way, then that’s a great place for Alexa.””

The future of computing as predicted by nine science-fiction machines
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/sep/04/science-fiction-computers-star-trek-the-matrix-hitchhikers-amazon-echo
via Instapaper
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1188929 2017-09-05T11:24:34Z 2017-09-05T11:24:35Z Technology will not save the world — we will (good FT read)
“Technology is marvellous, but it has had little or nothing to do with the best things about the world. And it will play a minor role in casting out humanity’s worst demons: poverty, ignorance and madness. What do I mean by the best things? The outlawing of racism; rights for disabled people; emancipation for women. The primacy of reason; the dwindling of superstition. Democracy, social security, animal rights, greater life expectancy and, yes, capitalism.

We are better at judgment than any machine we will be able to make for a very long time to come. Technology is only the agent of our desires

Marc Demarest”

Technology will not save the world — we will
https://www.ft.com/content/416a773e-8e31-11e7-9580-c651950d3672
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1188151 2017-09-01T20:49:10Z 2017-09-01T20:49:11Z I invested early in Google and Facebook. Now they terrify me (Roger McNamee)


"The people at Facebook and Google believe that giving consumers more of what they want and like is worthy of praise, not criticism. What they fail to recognize is that their products are not making consumers happier or more successful. Like gambling, nicotine, alcohol or heroin, Facebook and Google — most importantly through its YouTube subsidiary — produce short-term happiness with serious negative consequences in the long term. Users fail to recognize the warning signs of addiction until it is too late. There are only 24 hours in a day, and technology companies are making a play for all them. The CEO of Netflix recently noted that his company’s primary competitor is sleep.  How does this work? A 2013 study found that average consumers check their smartphones 150 times a day. And that number has probably grown. People spend 50 minutes a day on Facebook. Other social apps such as Snapchat, Instagram and Twitter combine to take up still more time. Those companies maintain a profile on every user, which grows every time you like, share, search, shop or post a photo. Google also is analyzing credit card records of millions of people. As a result, the big Internet companies know more about you than you know about yourself, which gives them huge power to influence you, to persuade you to do things that serve their economic interests. Facebook, Google and others compete for each consumer’s attention, reinforcing biases and reducing the diversity of ideas to which each is exposed. The degree of harm grows over time."

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2017/08/08/my-google-and-facebook-investments-made-fortune-but-now-they-menace/543755001/

Sent from Pocket 




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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1188147 2017-09-01T20:23:11Z 2017-09-01T20:23:13Z Job Opening: Leader of the Free World... Germany ?
“Economic policymakers must keep their borders open and ensure the stability of the global economy,” he said, adding that such a feat could only be accomplished on a global scale if everyone works together.

Obviously Germany must decide how much of the leadership vacuum it is prepared to fill. If Germany doesn’t step up, other countries will, and they may not share Ms. Merkel’s affection for globalization, the rule of law and Europe’s vaunted democratic values.”

Job Opening: Leader of the Free World
https://global.handelsblatt.com/politics/job-opening-leader-of-the-free-world-817611
via Instapaper

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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1188145 2017-09-01T20:10:00Z 2017-09-01T20:10:00Z Ethical codes for our digital age | Futures Centre

Start in certainty and you will end in doubts. Start with doubt and you will end in certainty"

We're really excited (like, jumping up and down excited) to announce futurist, author and CEO of The Futures Agency, Gerd Leonhard as our keynote speaker for BreakOut. His latest book, Technology vs. Humanity, explores our 'Faustian' pact with technology and what it may mean to be human in the future. An absolute must see.



https://www.thefuturescentre.org/articles/155799/ethical-codes-our-digital-age
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1188141 2017-09-01T19:57:35Z 2017-09-01T19:57:35Z How Apple, Google, and Facebook Will Hasten the Next Era of TV | Backchannel
“That’s why the entrance of many of the remaining big tech companies really matters. These powerful corporations—the true masters of our current universe—are in the attention business, and they don’t necessarily hew to Hollywood’s often unexamined practices. Just as HBO, born of the cable era, changed programming with the idea of ad-free, movie-quality television, internet-era Netflix has proven that new programming models (like binge watching) can further upend viewing habits. The obsessively iterative internet companies—motivated by a determination to bolster their respective business models—will make an even bigger difference.

We will see the death of the kind of television programming that’s essentially been around since the 1950s: sitcoms, anthology dramas, general interest newsmagazines, and variety shows (whoops, already dead). Don’t be fooled that right now the numbers for broadcast television still top even the most popular offerings of HBO and Netflix. Their rigid formulas—with plotlines ebbing and flowing to accommodate infuriating commercial interruptions, adhering to standards based on minimizing offensiveness—have made them the walking dead. Already the idea of “watching television” seems like an antediluvian pursuit.”

How Apple, Google, and Facebook Will Hasten the Next Era of TV | Backchannel
https://www.wired.com/story/facebook-apple-and-google-will-hasten-the-next-era-of-tv/
via Instapaper

From 2012
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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1187889 2017-08-31T20:56:44Z 2017-08-31T20:56:45Z Why Voice Assistants Will Give You a Headache | Backchannel
“Picture this: It’s evening and, after a long day at the office, you’re finally home. You’re cutting some avocados as you prepare dinner when your voice assistant pipes up and reads you an important email that just came in. Without breaking your chopping stride, you dictate a reply—perfecting your guacamole while preserving your relationship with your boss.

This might sound like heaven to you—or, just as likely, hell. Either way, it’s about to be our reality.

When Amazon introduced Alexa, the tech industry quickly anointed voice as the next big thing. Sure, she was mostly reciting the weather and answering lewd questions from nine-year-old boys, but the future held much more. The rise of voice devices will rewrite the digital playbook in unpredictable ways—including how, when, and whether we have the ability to say, “Enough!” In a time when digital detoxing, unplugging, and disconnecting are widely discussed and even yearned for, voice could turn into the platform you can’t turn off.

As we currently experience them, voice assistants are passive devices. We call their names when we have a question, want to hear some music, or need to set a timer. Otherwise, they sit idle. Having Alexa operate the light switch for you, for example, isn’t a source of psychological stress. But it’s when these assistants begin actively demanding our time and attention that, some experts say, we’ll have a problem on our hands.”

Why Voice Assistants Will Give You a Headache | Backchannel
https://www.wired.com/story/why-voice-assistants-will-give-you-a-headache/
via Instapaper


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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1187880 2017-08-31T20:37:25Z 2017-08-31T20:37:25Z The age of AI surveillance is here
“Facial recognition in still images and video is already seeping into the real world. Baidu is starting a program where facial recognition is used instead of tickets for events. The venue knows who you are, maybe from a picture you upload or your social media profile, sees your face when you show up and knows if you’re allowed in. Paris tested a similar feature at its Charles de Gaulle airport for a three-month stint this year, following Japan’s pilot program in 2016, though neither have released results of the programs.

US governments are already beginning to use the technology in a limited capacity. Last week the New York department of motor vehicles announced that it had made more than 4,000 arrests using facial recognition technology. Instead of scanning police footage, the software is used to compare new drivers’ license application photos to images already in the database, making it tougher for fraudsters to steal someone’s identity. If state or federal governments expand into deploying facial recognition in public, they will already have a database of more than 50% of American adults from repositories like DMVs. And again, the bigger the dataset, the better the AI.”

The age of AI surveillance is here
https://qz.com/1060606/the-age-of-ai-surveillance-is-here/
via Instapaper



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tag:digitalethics.net,2013:Post/1187871 2017-08-31T20:09:18Z 2017-08-31T20:26:20Z A Country of Fear and Courage: What I Learned from Two Years in America - SPIEGEL ONLINE - International
“Fear, of course, is nothing new in America. It's a country that has always believed that the apocalypse is somehow just around the corner. But the level of fear that has developed in the United States -- both on a smaller and larger scale -- my God! You don't have to look very far to find it. Stores provide anti-bacterial wipes to protect their customers from germs on grocery carts. Parents obsessively coddle their children by driving them to school and picking them up each day. Fences surround playgrounds to prevent anything bad from happening. Alarms to protect classrooms from school shooters are ubiquitous. Hysteria is everywhere on the cable news channels.

A study was released recently about the things Americans fear the most. It includes literally everything. Terrorism and identity theft. Corrupt companies and financial ruin. Tornadoes and adultery. There is an explanation for this. America is no longer winning wars. Other countries suddenly also have a lot of power. Everything has become insanely fast. And the fear of external threats can influence the psyche -- there's no question about that.

There's also a domestic dimension to this fear. Many Americans no longer trust their politicians or the elite. They no longer know what to believe in a situation where the macroeconomic indicators are trending positive but the amount of money that lands in their wallets is getting ever smaller. Many believe they have to take their fate in their own hands. And that can be exhausting.”

A Country of Fear and Courage: What I Learned from Two Years in America - SPIEGEL ONLINE - International
http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/what-two-years-of-living-in-america-taught-me-a-1165557.html
via Instapaper

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